Gerald Ford Teacher Resources

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Should public humiliation be an acceptable consequence for a crime? Have your middle schoolers engage in a round table discussion about the recent resurgence of the use of public humiliation as a punishment for crimes in the United States. They evaluate President Gerald Ford's suggestion for publicly rebuking President Clinton. Use this lesson to outline the rules and roles of group discussion.
In this Gerald Ford worksheet, students read a 3 page excerpt on the life, career and death of President Gerald R. Ford. They then use the information they read to answer 8 multiple choice questions. The answers are on the last page of the packet.
Students examine the life of President Gerald R. Ford. After reading an article, they discuss his legacy. They collect articles written during his time in office and examine the key issues of his presidency. They write an article about how they feel legacies should be portrayed of a political figure.
In this American history learning exercise, learners read a biography about President James Earl Carter and answer 7 multiple choice questions.
Students research the Watergate crisis. They discover the differences in investigative reporting then and now.
Let your pupils judge whether or not the Electoral College should be eliminated. They can develop their opinions with the materials provided and activity described here. First, split your class into three groups: pro, con, and judge. After they complete research within these groups, they will move to groups of three with evenly distributed roles. A debate follows. To reflect on the activity, class members compose an essay to be graded with an advanced placement rubric.
Elementary schoolers examine money, then read a news article about new coins being produced by the U.S. Mint. The teacher introduces the article with samples of American money and a vocabulary activity, then students read the news piece and participate in a think-pair-share discussion. This lesson includes interdisciplinary follow-up activities.
A highly engaging warm-up activity kicks off this plan for teaching class members about the Vietnam War. After the anticipatory activity, the teacher chooses the means by which to provide an overview of the war (PowerPoint, lecture, textbook, etc.). Next, 11th graders answer a series of questions to ensure a fundamental understanding. Lastly, individuals receive a timeline strip with a particular event that they research. On paper, they create a description/depiction of the event and place it in chronological order with the other posters. All of the necessary resources are included.
Students recall visits to museums, then read a news article about a museum exhibit that shows what U.S. presidents were like during their childhood. In this U.S. history and current events lesson, the teacher introduces the article with a discussion and vocabulary activity, then students read the news piece and participate in a think-pair-share discussion. Lesson includes interdisciplinary follow-up activities.
An extremely engaging and well-designed "Who Wants to be a Millionaire"-type game awaits your class. The subject is American history, with an emphasis on questions about past presidents. The usual lifelines are built into the game, and the questions get quite challenging as the game goes on.
Students analyze the Constitution's wording regarding impeachment and discuss the impeachment process. They then design a survey based on student-generated questions about the charges against President Clinton and write a letter to the President expressing their opinions and offering advice.
Students use video, Internet research and discussion to consider the presidency of Richard Nixon. They obtain information from multiple perspectives and form an opinion of how Richard Nixon should be remembered.
Students review the Bill of Rights. They interpret how the American Government violated these rights with regard to Japanese Americans during World War II. They write down the violations of the Bill of Rights during Japanese internment with stated reasons why they were violations.
Students examine the economic and political challenges the past six presidents have faced during their terms of office, and how those challenges may or may not have impacted their chances for re-election. They create campaign slogans both for and against the presidents researched in class based on the economic and political climate at the time of their elections.
Though slightly dated (around the 2008 Presidential election), the information and discussion points in this presentation about political humor are solid. Use the slides in your language arts class in a lecture about semantics, or in a political science class about language in the media. A list of references and resource links could help to guide your lecture as well.
Students gather information about the meaning and process of impeachment through reading and discussion.  Next, students role play hypothetical cases.
This multiple choice review covers famous historical figures from all walks of life.  each slide has a scoring set up in the corner which assumes two teams and allows for hints and lifelines etc. but it is not clear how to use this section of the powerpoint.  The four questions are clearly presnted and there are some fun noises and animated transitions.  If an incorrect answer is selected bubbles appear, but if the canswer is correct the PowerPoint will proceed.
Students review Watergate Files and the Watergate Trial using Internet sites. They read about the people involved in Watergate. They discuss the events leading up to and after Watergate.
Ninth graders study the centrality of religion in the lives of many Americans and the ways in which religious beliefs shape political and social views of many citizens. They determine that in a nation of some 3,000 religious groups, we have to live together without religious consensus, adhering to principles of religious liberty in the First Amendment.
Students investigate the assassinations of four American presidents. Through research, groups create a dossier on one of the four men who were the assassins. After presentations of the dossiers, the class looks for common traits in background and upbringing of the men as well as the major issues of the time when the assassinations occurred.

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