Getting off to a Good Start Teacher Resources

Find Getting Off to a Good Start educational ideas and activities

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"Talent Show" is an ELD lesson planner that has beginning English language learners focus on expressing the author's viewpoint by using pronouns and noting details using adjectives. Additionally, 2nd graders will be asked to express problems and solutions a they write a script for a talent show. While the sentence frames are helpful there is not a lot of direction for putting together the final activity (the talent show). This definitely needs some expansion.
A variety of technological devices are used by English learners in order to create pages that go into a SmartBoard notebook. Idioms are the focus of the pages that are created. Creativity is encouraged. For example, the idiom "Putting their foot in their mouth," can be recorded with video, digital camera, or acted out. Each person creates a portrayal of an idiom for the notebook.
Using conjunctions and noting details are part of this 5-day Surprise plan. Beginning level students will sequence events by using the present progressive asking questions and formulating answers. For the final activity they will participate in a story structure sequence. This planner is missing components for a final product, however the sentence frames are helpful.
Fun ways to get your English Learner's involved in the classroom.
Take a calming walk through nature in this ELD lesson. With three Houghton-Mifflin stories ("Henry and Mudge and the Starry Night," "Exploring Parks with Ranger Dockett," "Around the Pond"), readers compare and contrast details, as well as separate fact from opinion. Differentiated instruction between Beginning, Intermediate, and Advanced levels provides increasingly challenging reading and writing ELD standards.
Tour the town with this ELD lesson, which involves three Houghton-Mifflin stories ("Chinatown," "A Trip to the Firehouse," "Big Bushy Mustache," and "Jamaica Louise James"). Learners practice their future tense and prepositions, as well as literary skills such as making judgments and inferences. Help your young readers blossom with the three differentiated levels within this lesson.
What happens during a natural disaster? Science and language arts come together in this resource, which works from three Houghton-Mifflin stories ("Earthquake Terror,"  "Eye of the Storm: Chasing Storms with Warren Faidley," and "Volcanoes"). ELD pupils will benefit from the differentiated vocabulary lists and sentence frames. The stories and provided questions help them practice sequencing events, expressing fact and opinion, and comparing and contrasting details.
Each literary skill is linked to a part of speech in this ELD lesson plan, which works with three Houghton-Mifflin stories ("The Grizzly Bear Family Book, The Golden Lion Tamarin Comes Home," and "My Side of the Mountain"). Learners practice making generalizations with adverbs, noting details with prepositions, and drawing conclusions with pronouns. The sentence frames and vocabulary lists are differentiated into Beginning, Intermediate, and Advanced skill levels.
Three coming-of-age Houghton-Mifflin stories (an excerpt from Where the Red Fern Grows, as well as "Last Summer with Maizon," and "The Challenge") show your ELD pupils the trials and tribulations of growing up. Differentiated sentence frames incorporate vocabulary and conventions, as well as practicing literary skills from ELD standards.
Intended to pair with four stories from Houghton-Mifflin ("Mariah Keeps Cool," "Mama's Best Friend," "Yang the Second & Her Secret Admirer," and "Dear Mr. Henshaw,"), this lesson plan differentiates into beginning, intermediate, and advanced levels. Learners identify the main points of the stories, state the problems, and then state the solutions. The lesson addresses several listening and speaking ELD standards, reading ELD standards, and writing ELD standards.
Students discover the meaning and history of April Fool's Day. In this holiday lesson, students are introduced to basic April Fool's Day vocabulary and visit suggested websites to find out the history behind April Fool's Day. Students choose from various writing topics to write about in their journals.
Fourth graders build language skills in the context of creating a classroom magzine. They participate in activities which help students communitcate ideas and information for a variety of purposes and for specific audiences using the conventions of written language; read materials for different purposes; express, respond to, and communicate ideas, topics, and opinions in oral and visual formats.
Eureka! Discover gold in this ELD history lesson, which provides both instruction and a number of activities. Teachers first engage the class in a "call and response" activity about people who came to California during the Gold Rush, and then guide them through application activities (creating cartoons and advertisements). Though the plan indicates an hour for completion, it could comfortably be split up over a few days.
Making simple changes in the classroom will allow for effective, sheltered instruction for English Language Learners.
Practice reading comprehension by having your class read a factual passage about World Teachers' Day and mach phrases, fill in the blanks, identify correct grammar usage, unscramble vocabulary words, sequence sentences from the passage, sequence words to create complete sentences, create questions and interview other students, and write an essay. They will answer 120 questions.
Designed to support a visit to the Smithsonian National Portrait Gallery exhibition “Picturing Hemingway: A Writer in His Time,” which ran from June 18, 1999 through January 2, 2000, the approach detailed and the activities included in the packet can be easily adapted to any classroom with Internet access. The four lessons focus on Hemingway's life, his writings, and other writers of the Lost Generation.  
Weathering both family dynamics and sudden storms are the main topics of these three stories from Houghton-Mifflin ("Brothers and Sisters," "Jalapeno Bagels," "Carousel," and "Thunder Cake"). Practice generalizing and sequencing events as you read about siblings, baking, and thunder. The lesson is differentiated for Beginning, Intermediate, and Advanced learners, and includes vocabulary and sentence frames for each skill level.
The true success of English Learners won't always shine through in the form of perfect test scores.
Technology brings to life the study of other countries and cultures! It also demonstrates to high schoolers how important information literacy is to individuals today. In this lesson small groups or individuals plan a trip to a country of their choice. This plan includes several topics they must cover in their research, like weather and foreign embassies. It also includes numerous websites for student use. The final assessment is a choice of authentic learning tasks such as a travel journal.
Learning to read is not a simple task, but there are methods for assisting pupils as they develop literacy skills. The first four pages of this resource include information about language development and reading development, as well as various strategies with a focus on English language learners. After the information section, you will find a breakdown of 12 reading strategies. Each strategy is placed in a chart and marked according to when to use it and written about in-depth with a description, goals, and methods for teaching the strategy.

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Getting off to a Good Start