Harlem Renaissance and Jazz Teacher Resources

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Harlem Renaissance lesson plans can bring the music, poetry, and literature of this time period alive.
Eighth graders discuss the Harlem Renaissance and the main artists to come out of that time period. They will also discuss how the Harlem Renaissance has influenced modern life and create a Web Quest that will chronicle their Internet research into the Harlem Renaissance.
Students identify themes of selected nonfiction, fiction, poetry and art to Harlem Renaissance jazz and describe the impact of jazz on African-American literature of the Harlem Renaissance
Middle schoolers discover the Harlem Renaissance. For this early 20th century lesson, students use various primary sources including handouts, worksheets, maps, music, and poetry to examine aspects of African American culture. Middle schoolers will engage in a series of activities geared at answering the days 'Big Idea'. This lesson includes web resources, assessments,  a 5 station activity, and worksheets.
Students investigate the African American culture in the 1920's and the Harlem Renaissance. They read and analyze poems written by poets of the Harlem Renaissance, listen to jazz music and identify the characteristics of the music, and answer a discussion question.
Students examine the men and women who were a part of the Harlem Renaissance. Individually, they recreate their favorite pieces of art from the time period and create their own original works after reading poem from the movement. In groups, they discuss the conditions of Harlem that made it possible for the Harlem Renaissance to occur.
Students investigate the history of African Americans by researching Harlem.  For this culture lesson, students examine a slide-show of images and identify the great African American singers and performers of the 20th century.  Students recite important quotes from the era and explore the beautiful music made in the Harlem Renaissance.
Students examine the time period of the Harlem Renaissance. As a class, they are introduced to five artists and discuss their art and techniques. Using the internet, they also research the philosophers of the time period and how situations were different after the movement. To end the lesson, they create their own artwork based on the techniques of the five artists examined at the beginning of the lesson.
Students investigate the history of African Americans by researching art and culture. For this Harlem Renaissance lesson, students complete a graphic organizer based on the artistic and musical history of Harlem in the early 1900's. Students discuss the positive effect it had on African Americans and identify some of the famous individuals such as Langston Hughes and Countee Cullen.
Students examine the time period of the Harlem Renaissance. In groups, they compare and contrast the type of art before and after the movement along with the state of society at the time. After reading a book on the topic of their choice, they answer comprehension questions and research a topic using the internet for their final project.
Students explore, analyze, study and read a variety of poems and listen to jazz that have their roots in the Harlem Renaissance. They then discuss the similarities and differences of themes in the works of different poets and composers.
Students examine the events of the Harlem Renaissance. Using art, music and literature from the time period, they discover the hopes and dreams of the authors and composers. They discuss what the Harlem Renaissance gave to the African-Americans what they did not have before the Great Migration.
Fifth graders discover the history of African Americans by investigating the Harlem Renaissance. In this African American culture lesson, 5th graders identify the key African American artists and musicians in the 1920's and 30's, specifically Langston Hughes, Jacob Lawrence and Louis Armstrong. Students view, read and listen to the work by the artists and answer study questions.
Students read selected poems and listen to jazz that have their roots in the Harlem Renaissance. They discuss the similarities and differences of themes in the works of different poets and composers.
Connect the ideas of jazz improvisation and art to writing poetry. Learners collaborate and write different lines of poetry, imitating the jazz styles of improvisation and freewriting. Take a close look at the poems "Tenebrae" by Yusef Komunyakaa, "Tapping" by Sonia Sanchez, and "Dream Boogie" by Langston Hughes. The lesson includes questions and key ideas to direct your instruction. Finally, writers compose their own poems in the style of the authors they have studied.
Students participate in a variety show of literary readings, musical and dance performances, and an art exhibition. They research the cultural achievements of the Harlem Renaissance and become familiar with its major figures.
Students identify and connect themes of selected nonfiction, fiction, poetry, and art to Harlem Renaissance jazz. They compare and contrast historical and fictionalized versions of the jazz scenes of the Harlem Renaissance. They describe the impact of jazz on African-American literature of the Harlem Renaissance.
The Harlem Renaissance inspired a group of writers, musicians, and artists whose influence is still seen today.
Students examine the blues, poetry, the Harlem Renaissance, and the 12-bar blues form. They watch a segment from the video, "VH1 Driven: Jamie Foxx," participate in a class discussion, and listen to songs by Ray Charles and a poem by Langston Hughes.
Middle schoolers explore the Jazz Age era and the Harlem Renaissance. Using internet research, they gather information about the artists, cultural, and events of the time, and how they affected the art. Students complete a compare period in art to past and future artistic periods.

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Harlem Renaissance and Jazz