Health Teacher Resources

Find Health educational ideas and activities

Showing 41 - 60 of 220 resources
Investigate popular scientific claims and gather evidence to defend or argue against an author's stance. Writers synthesize information and compose their own "Really?" columns modeled after those found in the weekly "Science Times" section of the New York Times. The lesson reinforces the development of clear arguments as well as the use of appropriate evidence and details to support claims.
Learners research sleep following a class discussion on an article in The New York Times. Students use their research information to create a health and wellness exhibit that addresses topics related to sleep.
Learners develop pamphlets for a dental health mentoring program that educates younger students about caring for their teeth. They recall experiences at visits to dentists and consider why some students may have poor dental health.
Learners explore various theories about laughter, laughter's effects on our mental health, and the benefits of laughter to our immune system.
Students read "Next Stop for the Subway, a Fully Automated Future" from The New York Times and consider the effect of technology on their town or city. After discussing arguments for and against the new computer-based subway system in the article, students design and draw computerized public transportation for their town or city.
Address myths and stereotypes surrounding HIV and AIDS in this lesson plan. Students discuss how the disease is transmitted, how to properly apply a condom, and how to handle real life situations. Note: A number of extension activities, resources, and family supports are included.
Tenth graders identify the ten appeal methods Tobacco Companies use to target teenagers for cigarette sales.
Young scholars explore Nobel Prize winning economist Thomas C. Schelling's "strategic ergonomics" theory as it applies to making New Year's resolutions. They make their own resolutions and develop plans to keep them using Schelling's strategies.
Students are introduced to various concepts related to suicide prevention. They watch a video, read case studies, distinguish between facts and myths about suicide, identify suicide warning signs and participate in class discussion.
Students explore the importance of sun safety in relationship to skin cancer prevention. They test the effectiveness of various sunscreens and administer and analyze a simple survey to their peers. In addition, they implement a public service campaign designed to increase student use of sunscreen and sun safety awareness.
Students outline a body on butcher paper. Students fill in the circulatory system using materials of various textures. Students decorate all the parts of the circulatory system with art articles, like buttons, yarn, etc.
Students read sections of the novel, "The Jungle". They identify the problems of the meat industry during the Progressive Era. They discuss food concerns of today and make connections between the two time periods.
The fascinating topic of human skin color is examined in this article from Muse magazine. It highlights a study done by a pair of scientists on the relationships among strength of sunlight, vitamins, and melanin in the skin. The results enhance our understanding of the evolution of skin color. Create a worksheet of comprehension questions or hold a discussion about this intriguing information. It can be used in a biology class when studying adaptations or evolution, or it can be used in a health class when studying the function of vitamins. 
Have your classes heard of nature deficit disorder? Help them find out more with notetaking activities based on Richard Louv's book Last Child in the Woods. The notetaking pages are included and can be put together at the end to form a tree. Close the lesson with a brief true and false quiz, which is also included.
Second graders learn about the human body. In this biology lesson plan, 2nd graders will begin with the basics of understanding charts and graphs and progress into units that cover the body systems, and mental and emotional health. Students will learn how their daily choices effect their bodies.
Students study practical data analysis within the constraints of the scientific method.  In this data instructional activity students collect and enter data into a computer spreadsheet then create graphs.
In small groups, teens take on different roles to discuss the qualifications for parenthood. An instruction sheet for group discussion is provided, as well as homework worksheets. Throughout these exercises, young adults take the time to consider culture, religion, race, past history, financial circumstances, support systems, and more. This is a comprehensive and poignant lesson to include in your health curriculum.
First graders explore and discuss what physical fitness actually is, its benefits and how to obtain it through a variety of ways. They summarize the five parts of physical fitness: cardiovascular endurance,muscular strength, muscular endurance, body composition, and flexibility. In addition, they assess the technique of jumping rope.
Students role play scenarios about making smart sexual choices. In this health lesson, students discuss the consequences of sexual decisions they make when they are teens. They analyze how these can affect their future and the people who care about them.
What does the term "lifestyle" mean? What constitutes an active lifestyle? What constitutes a healthy lifestyle? The main ideas in this lesson focus on what an active healthy lifestyle looks like. There are questions for discussion, and instructions for making a chart that ranks choices on a continuum. Learners conduct interviews to find out what others think and then create a Venn diagram to look at the differences and similarities. There are many aspects that go into an active, healthy lifestyle and this is a pretty good introductory lesson for covering them.