High School Non Fiction Teacher Resources

Find High School Non Fiction educational ideas and activities

Showing 1 - 20 of 315 resources
Students explore human migration, refugees and human rights. They read articles about immigration, create a migration journal, and participate in a mock human rights commission meeting. After collecting information about immigration, students write articles and create a newsletter about human rights, immigration, and possible solutions to immigration issues.
Students participate in a poetry and prose reading of their original work.  In this creative writing lesson, students write poems, fiction, and non-fiction to present in an individual performance.  Students work in groups to prepare a coffee house style public reading.
Young children read the story, Berlioz the Bear and complete various reading and writing activities. They learn about fiction and non-fiction, and complete graphing and writing activities for the story. Youngsters draw the bear and use different types of artistic techniques to illustrate their favorite part of the story.
Learners analyze ethics issues as they read science fiction works. In this science and ethics lesson, students read science fiction short stories of their choosing, investigate the ethics issues raised in the stories, and present dramatic presentations to their classmates. Learners discuss the implications of the ethics issues presented in class.
Begin with an online pre-quiz about West Nile Virus. Using a fictional scenario, young epidemiologists read how it is transmitted and examine the stages of the life cycle of a mosquito. They imagine that they are members of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, formulating plans for identifying infected persons and how to contain the spread of the virus. The 35-page lesson plan provides beneficial background information, worksheets, resource links, answer keys to ensure success at teaching this mini-unit to your biology masters.
Groups of high school learners conduct research on a particular era of African-American history, focusing on events, people, and places important to that era. Next, they review children's literature in four different genres. As a culminating activity, group members combine what they have learned in their research and readings to create their own piece of children's literature based on African-American history.
Students read the novel, "Night" by Elie Wiesel. Using excerpts from the novel, they complete a performance and literary technique objective. In groups, they finish handouts to give them more information on the Holocaust. They compare and contrast fiction and non-fiction writings and discuss the negativity found in "Night".
Do military recruiters plan to visit your campus? If so, the visit presents an opportunity for class members to engage in a series of action projects. Class members interview recruiters, propose a PTA meeting to discuss the pros and cons of military recruitment of high school young scholars, write essays on why they would or would not consider joining the military, conduct Internet research, and read war literature. Carefully consider your community before using this plan. Although an attempt is made to present a balanced view, the preponderance of literature suggested is anti-military.
In this characterization worksheet, students identify 7 characters from George Orwell's Animal Farm as they expose each as a main or subordinate character, reveal the character's motivation and main conflict, and note how the character and his motivations have affected the plot.
In this allegory worksheet, students examine the subgenre of allegory as they read a brief description of it and complete a graphic organizer with their observations of the use of allegory in George Orwell's Animal Farm.
Students write a Thanksgiving story. For this creative writing lesson, students review fiction versus nonfiction and plot development. Students are presented with a list of words which must be included in a short story about Thanksgiving.
Students read a science fiction story and respond to questions as a two-day homework assignment. The class is divided into cooperative learning groups which are given tasks based on the story. The entire class views the results of each group.
Little artists explore the shapes and nature of insects. They construct one-dimensional insects out of paper and read both fiction and non-fiction books that describe insect life. Note: The lesson is lacking in procedure but is a good learning idea.
Your emerging readers know not to judge a book by its cover, but they can categorize these titles into either fiction or nonfiction. There are four book covers pictured here, and scholars record the titles under the corresponding text type. There are a few introductory sentences explaining the difference, however you will want to review this with the class ahead of time. Challenge them to explain their reasoning.
Young scholars read and view information sent from seven high school students who travel to China. The daily reports that they send back to the weblog section of the site should be of high interest to young scholars in Minnesota.
Guide your class through Upton Sinclair's The Jungle with this reading activity. A reading schedule, literature question page, and supplementary list of literary activities makes this book report form a great addition to your junior high or high school class. The activity would work in any class setting, not just homeschool.
Complete with a reading schedule, literature question page, and supplementary list of literary activities, this book report form on Moby Dick would be an good resource for your junior high or high school class. The guide includes resources for online reading. The rest of the lesson is not specific to the novel, and can be used with any book or story. Also, the activity would work in any class setting, not just homeschool.
With a reading schedule, literature question page, and supplementary list of literary activities, this book report form would be an excellent addition to your junior high or high school class. The activities in the lesson lend well to class assignments or an individual report, depending on skill level. The lesson is designed for homeschool, but would be fine in any class setting. Though it mentions Cyrano De Bergerac, the format is not novel-specific.
With several activities such as a reading schedule, literature question page, and supplementary list of literary projects, this novel activity would be an excellent addition to your junior high or high school class. Use the activities for any novel, as only the list of online resources is specific to Tolkien's Return of the King. Additionally, the lesson is designed for homeschool, but would be fine in any class setting.
Designed for homeschoolers (but equally as effective for independent learners), this learning exercise focuses on Alice in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll. Middle and high school readers summarize, define vocabulary, and answer questions about the chapters they have read. The learning exercise includes several literary activities to extend learning. It also includes several online resources for the novel, though the rest of the activities are not specific to the book.