History of Science Teacher Resources

Find History of Science educational ideas and activities

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Students analyze effective story-telling and literary techniques used by playwright George Stevens, Jr. in the play 'Thurgood.' Students illustrate how past events have shaped their own lives by drawing a Lifeline of points in their lives, identify the literary devices used by George Stevens to depict the life of Thurgood Marshall on stage, and generate a Lifeline for a significant person from history, science, the arts or sports. Students adapt the Lifeline to the stage.
Incorporate history, science, and practical sense into teaching kids about the effects of the sun.
Theme park lesson plans help students learn about history, science, and have fun at the same time.
This lesson focuses on unit conversion, proportions, ratios, exponents, and the metric system. Discuss measurement with your math class and demonstrate how to solve several health-science word problems. Give learners a chance to visit an interactive website to practice identifying metric measurements and give them conversion problems to solve on a worksheet.   
Students use Inspiration to map cyclical events. They recognize links between separate events and structural patterns. They explore the Internet Connection section to browse additional resources on teaching about cycles used in history, science, or literature.
Find the right science fair project. Steve Spangler shows how to use a demonstration and turn it into an experiment. Additionally, he talks about the importance of coming up with a hypothesis.
Eighth graders research advancements in the science and technology, design and construct posters communicating those advancements. Groups will present their posters and information relating to the different cultures, inventors and time periods involved.
In this science worksheet, students write how they use science in everyday situations, and read an observation about floating and answer short answer questions. Students complete 12 questions.
Compare and contrast old and modern historical accounts of the life of Thomas Jefferson. Learners begin by evaluating the responsibilities of history textbooks in reporting historical events, people, and eras. Next, they discuss how new information should be used to enhance the information contained in standard texts. This exercise could be used as a critical thinking activity for your class.
Because they have been immersed in the digital world since birth, most young people don't spend a lot of time reflecting on the immediate or future impact of the Internet. It's a high-interest topic which makes this resource all the more appealing. In it, social science classes read about and watch a video on The Internet of Things (IoT). If you are unfamiliar with this term, you're not alone. Definitions are loose, but the general idea is that the IoT includes physical objects that can digitally transfer data. It already exists, but there is a movement to expand this source of information. An example of one such device is a "smart" prescription bottle cap that keeps track of medication doses. After the class discusses the concept, controversies, and conducts additional research, they have a debate. Lastly, individuals write an evaluative essay on the potential impact of the IoT on a specific population of people. While the resource indicates that this is a 3-day lesson, I would plan for a buffer of a day or two. It includes standards, key vocabulary, a rubric, and clear instructions.
Students examine the relationship between relics found in history museum exhibits and the meaningful ways in which those relics are presented. They, in groups, select objects for a history exhibit about the event or time period of their choice.
Young scientists investigate the scientific concepts and principles that help make common toys such as hula hoops, yo-yos, slinkies, and silly putty work. As a class, they read "Backyard Rocket Science, Served Wet" to get a look behind the scenes of inventions. They then develop exhibits to display in a "Science of Toys" museum.
Examine ways in which historic places and landmarks represent significant themes and events in American history. Then create theme-based travel guides for related historic locations. This lesson requires informational reference materials and includes great discussion questions and extension activities.
Readers learn how to summarize scientific text and evaluate the advantages, disadvantages, and challenges in writing summaries. They select science-related articles you've pulled and collected from the New York Times and, with a partner, generate summaries. It's great to give learners choice!
Students investigate the role and nature of story-telling as it preserves history and culture and discuss how puppetry serves as an effective method of presentation. They create basic outlines for puppet shows that relay important historical events.
Students discuss advertisements and techniques they have discovered. They read an article about the science of selling and create an advertisement of their own to sell a book. They record people's reactions to their advertisement and analyze how they could have made it more effective.
Before one can understand the military tactics practiced throughout history, he needs to become familiarized with tactics practiced in the ancient past. Learners take a critical look at the military logistics used by Alexander the Great as he conquered Asia Minor and India, and how Scipio Africanus took New Carthage from Hannibal. The lesson culminates with a research paper or presentation and a self -assessment activity. Th lesson has excellent resources, is well written, and builds a solid foundation for later learning.
Use children's literature, coupled with hands on lessons, to teach the history and nature of science.
Students develop a setting, plot and characters for a science fiction story based on current news themes, and then individually write drafts of the story.
High schoolers study the four main subdivisions of anthropology and how they overlap. They explore the careers of several contemporary anthropologists and their fieldwork, comparing the methods and applications of their work.