Housing Teacher Resources

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Students research homelessness. In this current events lesson, students view a presentation about homelessness and discuss the different types of homelessness that can be found in communities. Students discuss the impact of homelessness and causes of homelessness.
Students examine the communities in transition in New Haven, Connecticut. In groups, they create a timeline of the important events of Newhallville and research the city's industries and immigrant populations. They compare and contrast the problems in the town from today and in the past. To end the lesson, they discover how various immigrants and cultures influenced the town.
Learners work together to examine how Americans acquired their fortunes. They compare and constrast the different levels of wealth. They discuss the power that wealth can bring as well.
Students examine selected local leaves in greater detail in the classroom by using more analytical drawing techniques. They use Thoreau's drawing of a Scarlett Oak as their model. Students choose a leave from a box of leaves removed from trees around Arlington High School grounds.
Students examine the Gross Domestic Product of past decades. After reading a case study, they identify the factors that make the GDP rise or fall. They review data on past recessions and how to reduce their frequency. They answer questions and discuss their answers to end the instructional activity.
Young scholars examine the Gross Domestic Product during the third quarter of 2001. Using the data, they develop possible reasons on why it decreased during that time. They discuss why changes in the GDP are important to the economy. They answer questions and discuss them as a class.
High schoolers investigate the concept of feudalism. The 14th century in the country of Czechoslovakia is used to create a context for coming up with a definition. They use a variety of resources to stimulate thinking that is to be observed during activities and discussion by the teacher for assessment.
Students explore the plight of African Americans and Japanese Americans during World War II. From analyzing video-taped interviews and reading historical narratives, students explore determine if the four freedoms apply to racial minorities living in the United States during this time. Students write a summary of their findings.

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