Housing Teacher Resources

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This is a fantastic resource designed for learners to envision what it was like for the three million African-Americans who migrated to urban industrial centers of the northern United States between 1910 and 1940. After reading a fictional interview detailing one family's unique experience of uprooting themselves for a better life, class members brainstorm what type of questions might have been asked in the interview. Then, after reading and learning more about the migrants' experiences as a whole, your young historians will interview someone they personally know who moved to their community as an adult and will then compose a short writing piece based on the interview.
What is the American Dream and how is it achieved? This lesson focuses in particular on the rise of the American Dream during the 1950s and includes a variety of primary sources for class members to interact with as they explore this idea and prepare for a Socratic seminar and a quick essay response.
Explore the dual role of prices as signals and incentives, and discover how prices are determined by buyers and sellers in the United States economy.
In this episode of Crash Course History, John Green whips through the evolution of communism in twentieth-century China. He covers topics from Sun Yat Sen's founding of the Republic of China to Mao Zedong's democratic dictatorship and cultural revolution. Be aware that this really is a "crash course", and very complex historical events are summarized in brief.
Invite your class to experience human rights situations first hand. Following an introduction to human rights, class members read statements and categorize them as a whole class. They then work in small groups to prepare a role play as well as solutions for their role-played issue. Each group presents their work when complete.
Engage your pupils in a high-interest topic while asking them to look closely into each source with document-based questions and a final essay. Learners explore the emergence of rap music through videos and reading selections. All of the videos and excerpts are included here. The plan calls for class members to cooperatively answer the questions; it's not entirely clear what this means, so structure these conversations in a way that works for your class. Strong materials and a topic with depth for class members to explore.
Looking for activities to accompany a reading of Jonathan Swift’s Gulliver’s Travels? Here’s an activity book that includes chapter-by-chapter cloze reading, vocabulary, and grammar exercises, quizzes, crossword puzzles, and discussion questions. An answer key is also provided. Worth a spot in your curriculum library.
Students analyze different perspectives of the history of the Holocaust. They experience primary and secondary sources along with pieces from literature, documentaries, songs and letters. A commitment of honor and dedication is expressed through the thoughts and feelings experienced by the survivors of the Holocaust viewed in this lesson.
Middle schoolers explore personal finance. They investigate spending, saving, and budgeting. Practice writing checks, managing a checking account, and developing a personal saving plan. A great way to bring the real world into the classroom.
Students prepare for and learn through a walking tour of Philadelphia. For this history lesson, students support their studies with a field trip. This lesson could be adapted to suit regions with other historic places or museums. 
Tenth graders discuss the events leading up to antisemitic behavior in Europe during World War II. Through various activities, 10th graders acquaint themselves with the political ideology of Nazism and assess responsibility for the Holocaust. Materials to complete this unit are included.
Students discover the concept of a "home" by conducting interviews.  In this community lesson, students discuss what the word "home" means to them as well as research Habitat for Humanity.  Students interview home renters as well as Habitat for Humanity home owners and discover what "home" means to them.
Learners construct a model of the hydrologic cycle, and observe that water is an element of a cycle in the natural environment. They explain how the hydrologic cycle works and why it is important, and compare the hydrologic cycle to other cycles found in nature. This is one of the most thoroughly thought-through, one-period lesson plans I've ever come across!
Students discuss their knowledge of payday loans and credit cards. In this Economics lesson, students complete a read an article and Q&A activity in groups, and play a vocabulary bingo game and a quiz game on payday loans. Students review a case study on payday loans and calculate the costs of credit usage. Students write a final chapter for the case study based on their findings as an assessment.
Students gain access to easily understood, timely interpretations of monthly announcements of rate of change in real GDP and the accompanying related data in the U.S. economy. They categorize items into GDP categories.
Sixth graders conduct historical research and consider the importance of photography as a data collection device. In this lesson on historical documentation, 6th graders formulate questions regarding historical documents in order to better interpret visual media as a mode for transmitting facets of history. Students will work in groups to discuss and research primary and secondary source documents.
Students read and discuss "Prosperity Extends Its Reach, but Not Far Enough to Benefit All," and examine the difficulty, for the working poor, in making ends meet, and propose philanthropic solutions.
Investigate the current financial market and have your class explore savings, borrowing, financial markets, mutual funds, and the stock market. This four-part lesson plan is designed to help students become knowledgeable and informed consumers.
Students discuss how people are reducing their fuel consumption, then read a news article about a new bike-sharing program in Washington, D.C. For this current events and alternative transportation lesson, the teacher introduces the article with a class discussion and vocabulary activity, then students read that news report and participate in a think-pair-share discussion. Lesson includes interdisciplinary follow-up activities.
Research the necessary components of a planet that supports life after reading the article "All of a Sudden, The Neighborhood Looks a Lot Friendlier" from The New York Times. After finding their information, middle and high schoolers create short science fiction stories in which they incorporate their research.

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