Hypothesis Teacher Resources

Find Hypothesis educational ideas and activities

Showing 101 - 120 of 267 resources
Students investigate friction by manipulating some of the variables affecting it. In this inquiry instructional activity, students design their own experiment. They create a video about it and share it to class.
Students investigate the species of flatfish. For this biology lesson, students read a flatfish information sheet participate in learning centers based on the flatfish. Students participate in learning centers such as identifying pictures of flatfish or completing a word search puzzle.
Mt. Rushmore wasn't built in a day, but how long will it stick around? How quickly is it eroding and what causes the fastest weathering? Explore these questions and more in a fun, interactive instructional activity about the earth's natural processes of weathering and erosion. 
Here is a fantastic experiment-based lesson plan on water conservation, waste, and filtration. The lesson plan is well-developed and provides background information, discussion leads, and six scripted lab activities anyone can do. The class will explore how much water they use in a day, how water is filtered, and where water comes from.  
Young environmentalists are introduced to the Air Quality Index by viewing a PowerPoint presentation. There is no link to the presentation, but it can be found by searching the title on the Internet. An accompanying worksheet is to be filled out along the way. Learners then use petroleum jelly or double-sided sticky tape to collect airborne particulates, which they then view under a microscope. Some extension ideas are provided, including a fun interactive smog simulation.
Scientific exploration often starts with a big question. The big question learners are going to explore is: "Do both male and female crickets chirp?" The class will pose and test a hypothesis based on the singing habits of these insects and habitat changes that occur during the experiment. The lesson comes in two parts, and includes a well-constructed materials list and a pre-activity worksheet.
Don't let your pupils take everything at face value! They should analyze and evaluate what speakers say. Practice this skill with the two related activities described here. After brainstorming critical questions, learners can listen to the provided persuasive pieces and then pick them apart. The resource also includes two quizzes, one based on an excerpt, and another that tests more general knowledge.
High schoolers examine writings from the period the American Revolutionary War. They focus on the writing of Benjamin Franklin, and attempt to emulate his style and focus. Franklin's writings literally helped to transform the nation, and he kept a type of journal called a "virtue log." Students make their own virtue logs, and write about something they want to improve in themselves, society, or at school. This three-day project should lead to some thoughtful writing, and it will be interesting to hear what each pupil has to say.
Physical science learners conduct a simple experiment using the heat of their hands to affect the fluid pressure. They place a balloon atop a freezing cold bottle and observe what occurs as it warms up. Both activities demonstrate how increasing temperature creates higher pressures. With this knowledge, they construct a fountain and a thermometer. Detailed background information, materials and procedures, reading suggestions, and assessments make this a valuable resource for your physical science sessions.
Students participate in a variety of activities surrounding their study of ponds. They visit a pond, collect organisms, view them under a microscope, perform simple chemical tests, and finally, create small ponds in the classroom.
Through the use of a Reading Rainbow episode, clever in-class games and activities, and an ITV Series video, second and third graders engage in a study of the scientific method; what it is, and how scientists use it. This well-designed plan should lead to a thorough understanding of this important technique used by scientists throughout the world.
In this electrical worksheet, students design and build a circuit board using diodes, transistors, and dry cell batteries, to grasp the understanding of circuit design before answering a series of 15 open-ended questions that include analyzing schematics. This worksheet is printable and there are on-line answers to the questions.
Students complete a variety of lab and discussion activities as they are introduced to ethics and honest lab practices. They perform various biology, chemistry, or physics labs which test their ethical lab practices.
Students explore the importance of sun safety in relationship to skin cancer prevention. They test the effectiveness of various sunscreens and administer and analyze a simple survey to their peers. In addition, they implement a public service campaign designed to increase student use of sunscreen and sun safety awareness.
In this electrical activity, students design and build a circuit board to grasp the understanding of circuit design including clipper and clamper circuits and  before answering a series of 21 open-ended questions that include analyzing schematics. This activity is printable and there are on-line answers to the questions.
In this electrical activity, students draw a schematic design and build a circuit board to grasp the understanding of power conversion circuits before answering a series of 30 open-ended questions including analyzing schematics. This activity is printable and there are on-line answers to the questions.
In this physics worksheet, students complete circuit true tables and solve 67 questions on Boolean algebra. They identify different logic gate circuits.
In this electrical worksheet, students design and build a circuit board to grasp the understanding of DC-AC circuit design before answering a series of 25 open-ended questions that include schematics. This worksheet is printable and there are on-line answers to the questions.
Students explore the human anatomy. In this respiratory system activity, students conduct an experiment to simulate the capacity of human lungs. 
Learners read and discuss information regarding George Washington Carver and how the peanut became cultivated in the southern colonies of the United States. In this George Washington Carver lesson, students develop vocabulary that relates to the cultivation of the peanut and its origin.  Learners then soak shelled raw peanuts and plant them while observing changes.

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