Influential People 1960-1980 Teacher Resources

Find Influential People 1960 1980 educational ideas and activities

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Pupils evaluate the Kennedy Administration's involvement in the civil rights movement. In this Civil rights lesson plan, students read and take notes from speeches connected to the historic March on Washington from the National Archives in a jigsaw format. Pupils write editorial articles from the perspective of different newspapers commenting on the speeches.
In this online interactive history quiz worksheet, students respond to 50 multiple choice questions about the American Civil Rights Era. Students may submit their answers to be scored.
"It was my view then, and still is, that you don't make war without knowing why." Remembering Vietnam is a powerful resource. The essential questions, the activities, the readings, the materials examined all seek to provide learners with the information Tim O'Brien refers to in The Things they Carried. The objective stance permits individuals to formulate their own opinions about the Vietnam War and the Vietnam Memorial. A must-have for an English Language Arts or Social Studies curriculum library.
Pupils investigate the concept of foot soldiers with oral history. They are provided with primary and secondary resources. Students differentiate the terms of oral history versus the written record of history. They have class discussion to determine the validity of oral history.
Students consider which aspects of world around them have roots in 1960s, research and compare 1960s to today with regards to Civil and Women's Rights, Vietnam, counterculture, music, voting, and economic rights, and explore legacy of 1960s by interviewing several adults who were teenagers or older in that decade.
In this controversial issues worksheet, students read 15 famous quotations on controversial topics and identify who said each of them.
Students examine myths and stereotypes about Hispanic immigrant groups. They appreciate and share the strengths of their diversity and view films that challenge ideas about education and cultural values. They explore the Latino Rights Movements that took shape in the l960's and l970's.
Students analyze civil disobedience through history studying Thoreau, Gandhi, and Dr. King. In this civil disobedience lesson, students read and analyze excerpts from Thoreau, Gandhi, and Martin Luther King. Students demonstrate their reading comprehension of the lesson by creating a skit, digital story, or analysis paper.
Studying African American history? Explore and discuss famous African Americans such as Martin Luther King Jr., George Washington Carver, Harriet Tubman, and more. Simple bulleted facts detail the heroic deeds of these individuals. Use as an introduction to jump start February's African American history month with your students.
“I have in my hand 57 cases of individuals who would appear to be either card carrying members or certainly loyal to the Communist Party. . .” Senator Joseph McCarthy certainly stirred the pot with his claims. The result was a series of legislative actions that put McCarthy in the spotlight and First Amendment rights in jeopardy.  Was Congress’s violation of the First Amendment during the McCarthy Era justified? To prepare to respond to this guiding question, class members examine a series of primary source documents including the First Amendment, the Smith Act, and Joseph McCarthy’s speech delivered February, 1950, in Wheeling, West Virginia. After group and full-class discussions, individuals craft an essay using evidence drawn from the documents to support their argument.
Students explore landmark Supreme Court cases that have challenged the First Amendment right of the people to assemble peaceably. They create communication campaigns appropriate to the time, which urge fellow protesters to assemble peacefully.
Pupils analyze a variety of primary source materials related to lynching (news articles, letters written to or written by prominent Americans, pamphlets, broadsides, etc.) in order to assess the effectiveness of the anti-lynching campaign spearheaded by African-Americans. This resource focuses on Billie Holiday's signature song, "Strange Fruit," a protest song Lewis Allen (Abel Meeropol) wrote in 1938 about the ongoing and intransigent problem of lynching in the American South.
African American history during the Jim Crow era includes encounters with poverty, racism, disrespect, and protest. Harper Lee develops all four of these themes in her famous 1960 novel, To Kill a Mockingbird. To help students understand these ideas, this
Students examine the arguments for and against the United States involvement in the Vietnam War. In groups, they must assign the Vietnam War a just or unjust war using the techniques used to fight and the reasons used by the government to declare war. They present their ideas to the class making sure to support their arguments. To end the activity, they develop viable alternates to war.
Third graders complete various activities pertaining to Martin Luther King Jr. Day, President's Day, Memorial Day, Labor Day, Columbus Day, and Veteran's Day. They conduct research and complete writing and art activities on the background of each federal holiday.
Eleventh graders are introduced to the events between the years 1949 and 1989. They list and explain key events and people that contributed to the development of the Cold War. Students are asked "what do you think Billy Joel meant by 'We didn't start the fire', and why do you think this has historical relevance, or does it?"
Students, in groups, listen carefully to the song(s) and to complete worksheet.
Students explore protest songs. In this interdisciplinary lesson, students examine issues-based music by summarizing lyrics and revealing inferences, generalizations, conclusions, and points of view found in the songs.
In this famous people worksheet, students read a selection about Noam Chomsky and complete a variety of comprehension activities including but not limited to a synonym match, spelling, writing and sequencing activities.
Seventh graders read "Diary of a Young Girl" by Anne Frank. In groups, they discuss the reasons why people would write an autobiography and identify their own identity crisis. After reading excerpts of other autobiographies, they attempt to write their own and if comfortable share it with the class.