John Adams Teacher Resources

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In this online interactive history quiz worksheet, students respond to 49 multiple choice questions about the accomplishments of John Adams. Students may submit their answers to be scored.
Eighth graders explore letters written by Abigail Adams to her husband. In this political lesson, 8th graders read letters written by Abigail Adams to her husband, John Adams. Students analyze the letters and discuss their findings.
Students examine the Alien and Sedition Acts. In this civics lesson, students explore international relations during John Adams' presidency. Students research the Alien and Sedition Acts.
Students use story maps to review a history concept. For this U.S. history lesson, students analyze the change in presidency from George Washington to John Adams as they create a story map.
In this reading comprehension learning exercise, 5th graders will read a passage about John Adams and Bunker Hill. Students will then respond to five fill in the blank and five multiple choice questions about the story.
Students explore U.S. history by identifying key figures of our past. In this American Revolution lesson, students view photographs of leaders such as Jefferson, Hancock and John Adams. Students discuss their accomplishments and participate in a role-playing activity in which they are members of colonist committees.
In this everyday editing worksheet, students correct grammatical mistakes in a short paragraph about President John Adams. The errors range from capitalization, punctuation, grammar, and spelling.
In this early American history activity, students read the letter that Abigail Adams wrote the her husband John Adams titled "Remember the Ladies." Students then paraphrase the letter and complete other colonial activities.
In this online interactive history quiz worksheet, students respond to 5 short answer and essay questions about the life and accomplishments of John Adams.
For this essay worksheet, learners read the quote by John Adams, "A government of laws, and not of men." Students write an essay about what they think this means.
Should limits be placed on freedom of speech in a time of national emergency? This is a question that has arisen at various points throughout the history of the United States, first originating with the Sedition Acts of 1798. Read about the events that led to the passage of this act and how the state legislatures of Virginia and Kentucky would subsequently resolve this act to be unconstitutional.
Students research and briefly summarize the international situation during John Adams's presidency. They list the concerns that led to the Sedition Act and describe it.
Students research and discuss the consequences of the Sedition Act. They illustrate the difficulty of balancing security needs and personal freedom using an example from John Adams's presidency.
High schoolers research and cite arguments Jefferson used in objecting to the Sedition Act. They discuss Jefferson's opinion on how constitutional questions about the Sedition Act could be resolved.
For this online interactive history quiz worksheet, students respond to 50 multiple choice questions about the accomplishments of Thomas Jefferson. Students may submit their answers to be scored.
Students examine Thomas Jefferson's arguments when objecting to the Sedition Act. In this Thomas Jefferson lesson, students read about Thomas Jefferson's arguments against the Sedition Acts using on-line material while working in groups. They write a position paper based on the material which is used as an assessment.
In this online interactive history quiz worksheet, students respond to 50 multiple choice questions about George Washington. Students may submit their answers to be scored.
Students participate in trial simulation following the Boston Massacre in which they use core map A to help present their evidence and testimony.
In this online interactive history activity, students respond to 11 short answer and essay questions about the United States between 1797 and 1809. Students may check some of their answers on the interactive activity.
Students examine how the role of 'President' was defined by the founding fathers. They explore various websites, answer discussion questions, read and analyze primary source documents, and complete a chart.

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