John Donne Teacher Resources

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Twelfth graders read and analyze John Donne's 'Holy Sonnet 10,' and examine their personal beliefs about death. They identify the nouns and adjectives in the poem, watch various video clips, and write a paraphrase of the poem.
Not dreadful, but mighty, this worksheet for “Divine Sonnet X” (aka “Death Be Not Proud”) models for individuals how to recognize John Donne’s argument for why Death should not be proud and how to recognize the sonnet structure and rhyme scheme. Extend the exercise by asking readers to consider the significance of the change in the rhyme scheme in the final lines of the poem.
Eleventh graders analyze works by John Donne and Thomas Heriot. In this Colonial America lesson, 11th graders examine pieces of literature, documents, and video clips to identify the issues regarding religion in the colonies. Student also take notes on a PowerPoint presentation about Virginia and John Donne.
Learners write poetry using voice and strong ideas. In this creative writing instructional activity, students read the poem, "Death Be Not Proud" by John Donne, and then write a similar poem giving personality to their own object or idea and using strong voice.
Concluding a study of metaphysical poetry? Challenge John Donne scholars with a worksheet that asks them to identify the subject of several of his poems, to interpret lines, to find examples of metaphysical conceits, and to analyze how the poet develops his themes.
In this reading comprehension worksheet, learners respond to 5 short answer and essay questions based on the poem "The Computation," by John Donne.
In this hyper yacht reading activity learning exercise, students read a passage about an unusual yacht, then work with a partner on vocabulary and comprehension activities, answers included.
In this reading comprehension worksheet, students respond to 4 short answer and essay questions based on the "Batter My Heart," by John Donne.  
Students explore the ways that local, national, and global events are interconnected. They identify current issues at a local and global level, identify organizations that seek to improve conditions in other countries, and examine the role of non-profit organizations.
In this reading comprehension worksheet, students respond to 6 short answer and essay questions based on Donne's poem "The Flea."
In this reading comprehension activity, students respond to 5 short answer and essay questions based on Donne's "Death Be Not Proud."
In this reading comprehension worksheet, students respond to 4 short answer and essay questions based on the poem "At the round earth's imagined corners," (Holy Sonnet 7).
For this reading comprehension worksheet, students respond to 4 short answer and essay questions based on themes in "The Flea." Students may also complete their choice of 3 reading activities suggested.
In this reading comprehension worksheet, students respond to 4 short answer and essay questions based on themes in "The Flea." Students may also complete their choice of 3 reading activities suggested.
To memorize, or not to memorize: that is the question. Whether 'tis nobler to suffer the fear and anguish of committing a poem to memory, to endure the heartache, to shuffle off this fear, and face the stares of classmates with the hue of resolution, or to refuse to face this sea of troubles and to sleep. Young orators read an article about the value of memorizing poetry, and then engage in a series of activities that prepare them for their performances. Detailed instructions for the activities, links to the article, and to suggested poems, are all included in the packet.
Display a wealth of content knowledge in this PowerPoint for Macbeth that enlightens your readers with a respectable quantity of background information on the real Macbeth, the succession and history of King James, and of course Shakespeare’s purpose for creating Macbeth. The presentation also includes a pop culture comparison that can serve as a catalyst for a unit on literary vs. commercial literature where readers juxtapose the play to a contemporary piece of literature that deals with similar subjects and themes.
There is nothing more frustrating than discussing theme in literature, and now the Common Core requires that your learners determine two or more, and discuss the development of it throughout the text. This is crazy, but manageable with the information and structure in this resource that will transform your students' definition of theme from a moral of a story into an exploration of universal experiences in literature. Included are ideas on how to scaffold your approach, a template for a motif tracker, and an assessment that can be modified for your class texts.     
Travel back thousands of years to the origin of the number system and watch how that development gradually produced the zero symbol. Class members will learn a little bit about math and a little bit about how language is shaped in this brief video. Try out the additional materials or flip the lesson. Note: Viewers must read the additional information before attempting the included questions.
Students read and analyze the poem, "To His Coy Mistress," by Andrew Marvell. They identify the theme of each stanza, complete a worksheet, take an online quiz, and write about a single metaphor or image from the poem.
Discuss tone and imagery with Andrew Marvell's "To His Coy Mistress." In an attempt to get his fair lady to consummate their relationship, he write a poem urging her to seize the day! Introduce the author to your high school class, conduct a close reading of the poem, and discuss the tone and imagery he uses. Consider pairing this activity with a writing assignment where your learners attempt to persuade someone to do something with rich tone.   

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