Judicial System Teacher Resources

Find Judicial System educational ideas and activities

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In this U. S. government worksheet, students respond to 19 short answer questions about the responsibilities of Supreme Court members in the United States.
Young scholars analyze the judiciary system.  In this government lesson, students participate in a class discussion on methods to prevent unfairness in the Judicial courts.
Students explore the constitutional guarantee of the right to trial by jury. In this U. S. Constitution lesson, students read or view Twelve Angry Men and respond to discussion questions regarding the jury. Students examine the constitutional provisions raised by the book/film and create posters that promote the assurance of impartial juries in the American judicial system.
Twelfth graders discover details about Wisconsin v. Mitchell. In this Judicial Branch lesson, 12th graders practice their Supreme Court vocabulary and participate in the prepared Supreme Court simulation.
Twelfth graders discover details about Wisconsin v. Mitchell. In this Judicial Branch lesson, 12th graders practice their Supreme Court vocabulary and participate in the prepared Supreme Court simulation. As a culminating activity, students write briefs.
Young scholars explore the three branches of government. In this government and U.S. history lesson, students listen to a story about a boy who attempts to sponsor a bill to ban cartoons. Young scholars interview three teachers who each represent one of the branches of government. Students share facts they discovered about the executive, legislative, and judicial branches of government.
Learners examine the US Constitution, Bill of Rights, and Supreme Court cases in order to broaden their understanding of the US Judicial System. They research a variety of textual and Internet resources to create a tri-fold brochure, which houses a summary and pro/con argument related to one Civil Rights issue.
Twelfth graders explore the functions of the Federal Court System. In this Judicial Branch lesson, 12th graders examine the needs for courts as they discuss justice and rights, take a virtual tour of the Supreme Court building,and complete the provided guided reading handouts. 
Twelfth graders discover details about selected Supreme Court cases. In this Judicial Branch lesson, 12th graders research selected cases and then make classroom presentations on the cases following the provided rubric.
Twelfth graders discover details about selected Supreme Court cases. In this Judicial Branch lesson, 12th graders research selected cases and then make classroom presentations on the cases following the provided rubric.
High schoolers examine various types of justice within society: social, personal and constitutional. They use primary texts, fictional literature and non-print sources provide the basis for discussion. Lesson is based on the novel, To Kill a Mockingbird.
This true or false exercise covers basic knowledge about the branches of government. This worksheet is composed of 10 statements. Learners must determine if each statement is true or false. If it is false, they write in the correct answer. This would be a good way to see if your class is clear on the responsibilities of each branch of the government. Use it as a homework assignment or exit slip.
Seventh graders discover details about the responsibilities of the 3 branches of government in the United States. In this checks and balances lesson, 7th graders view a SMART Board supported lecture that reveals the jobs of the legislative, judicial, and executive Branch members.
Twelfth graders determine how the Supreme Court has changed over time. In this Judicial Branch lesson, 12th graders watch a video segment about polling and the conduct their own polls of the public's view of judicial activism and judicial restraint. Students collect, interpret, and share their data.
Twelfth graders explore the role of the Judicial Branch. For this U.S. government lesson, 12th graders participate in a mock Supreme Court trial. Students discuss the experience and the effects that the court has on them.
Students identify the four individuals who are identified as the "Big Four", examine the years they were on the bench together, and look and the impact they made in key cases.
Students explore the powers of the Supreme Court. In this Judicial Branch lesson, students define vocabulary regarding the branch's responsibilities, take notes on a video regarding the branch, and discuss the powers of the branch in a teacher-led discussion.
Students understand the purpose of the judicial branch of government. In this judiciary lesson, students participate in exercises to understand how the court system works. Students complete activity sheets to develop understanding of courts and peer mediation.
High schoolers research the Constitutional provision for the Judicial branch of government. They examine different U.S. founder's positions on the relative strength of the judicial branch and act as a review court for Marbury vs. Madison.
Learners explore their beliefs about objectivity and the United States justice system. They examine the facets of a criminal case by researching various aspects of the judicial system and apply what they have learned to the Michael Jackson trial.