Judicial System Teacher Resources

Find Judicial System educational ideas and activities

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This true or false exercise covers basic knowledge about the branches of government. This worksheet is composed of 10 statements. Learners must determine if each statement is true or false. If it is false, they write in the correct answer. This would be a good way to see if your class is clear on the responsibilities of each branch of the government. Use it as a homework assignment or exit slip.
Fifth graders explore the three branches of the Federal Government and their responsibilities. They rotate through three centers to describe 3 responsibilities of each branch. They summarize their findings in the centers by visiting posters of each branch and answering questions.
Fourth graders discuss what they think of when they hear the word government and write their suggestions on the board. They discuss what the state government is and what it does. They then discover the three separate branches of government and their responsibilities.
Learning about the three branches of government can be fun. Pupils learn about government using the resource links provided, answer questions, and create a PowerPoint presentation on the legislative branch.
Fourth graders brainstorm of what they think of when they think about the word state government and list their suggestions on the board. They listen to lecture about the three branches of government understanding how each branch is connected to the others.
In this Congress learning exercise, students read a passage about the U.S. Congress, then complete 4 multiple choice questions. An answer key is included.
Seventh graders discover details about the responsibilities of the 3 branches of government in the United States. For this checks and balances lesson, 7th graders view a SMART Board supported lecture that reveals the jobs of the legislative, judicial, and executive Branch members.
Twelfth graders determine how the Supreme Court has changed over time. For this Judicial Branch lesson, 12th graders watch a video segment about polling and the conduct their own polls of the public's view of judicial activism and judicial restraint. Students collect, interpret, and share their data.
Fourth graders explore the executive branch of government; in particular, Florida's executive branch of government.
Students research the branches of government and write summaries about both the state and federal systems. After conducting reaserch in texts and online, students create Venn diagrams displaying the governmental functions of the three branches.
Fourth graders use their imagination to create a story about being present when the Great Seal of Ohio was designed. They draw a picture of the Great Seal of Ohio.
Fourth graders examine the meanings of symbols on the Ohio state Seal. They create their own personal seals which include three items about themselves. They write explanations about their seals.
Fourth graders investigate the state of Ohio's claim to be the "Mother of Presidents." Nine U.S. presidents were from the state and their contributions and terms of office are examined in this lesson.
Fourth graders examine the history of the Ohio Statehouse and order the major historical events in its development. The instructional activity traces the development from the time of Ohio's vast wilderness to the house's completion in 1861.
Fourth graders research services and responsibilities of local government. They use cameras to take pictures of local government in action and create posters with them.
Eighth graders examine the role of the U.S. Federal Court System. In this Judicial Branch lesson, 8th graders participate in a prepared mock trial. This lesson is 14 of 16 in the unit plan, "The US and WV: In Pursuit of Independence."
Students analyze economic and political freedoms. Once they identify ways to measure them, they explore the relationship between the two freedoms and social well-being. In groups, they select 20 countries from the four freedom categories and graph the relationship between their economic freedom and the gross domestic product.
Twelfth graders explore the role of the Judicial Branch. In this U.S. government lesson, 12th graders discuss the qualifications and responsibilities of Supreme Court Justices. Students then take notes on the structure of the court.
Twelfth graders explore the role of the Judicial Branch. For this U.S. government lesson, 12th graders take notes regarding how the courts have changed over time and then become observers of the court's history as they create timelines that highlight the major changes.
Twelfth graders explore the role of the Judicial Branch. In this U.S. government lesson, 12th graders discuss the qualifications and responsibilities of Supreme Court Justices. Students then create timelines that feature the history of the court.