Labor movement Teacher Resources

Find Labor Movement educational ideas and activities

Showing 1 - 20 of 144 resources
Tenth graders, in groups, explore the garment industry before, during, and after the Triangle Shirtwaist Fire to learn about the Labor Movement, unions, and some of the people who impacted working conditions for both adults and children workers in America.
Have your class organize information about strikes in a handy chart. Pupils take notes on the Homestead Strike, the Lawrence Strike, and the Pullman Strike. Along the left side of the chart are six questions for learners to answer about each of the strikes.
In this online interactive American history instructional activity, students answer 13 fill in the blank questions regarding the rise of big business and the labor movement. Students may submit their answers to be scored.
In this online interactive American history instructional activity, students answer 10 multiple choice questions regarding big business and the labor movement. Students may submit their answers to be scored.
In this online interactive American history worksheet, students answer 10 multiple choice questions regarding the rise of big business and the labor movement. Students may submit their answers to be scored.
For this online interactive American history worksheet, students answer 13 fill in the blank questions regarding the rise of big business and the labor movement. Students may submit their answers to be scored.
In this online interactive American history worksheet, students answer 10 multiple choice questions regarding the rise of big business and the labor movement. Students may submit their answers to be scored.
Young historians will explore the complex causes and effects of industrialization in China by perusing the numerous articles included in this webpage. Throughout the resource, there are many writing and discussion prompts to help direct and focus your class in their thinking. Ultimately, use these articles to foster a class debate on the countries' industrialization process. Because of the themes it explores, this lesson would go well with a unit on the American Industrial Revolution. 
Students examine the labor movement. For this labor issues lesson, students discuss the role of labor organizations and research their beginnings in order to better understand the debate over the Employee Free Choice Act.
Students research the labor movement and write a feature article based on the research.
When your upper elementary class returns in the fall, have them identify and define the beginnings of the labor movement and Labor Day in the United States. They thoughtfully reflect on changes that have occurred in the way we think about this holiday. They also write a contribution to a Labor Day scrapbook, such as a letter to a pen pal in another country who doesn't celebrate Labor Day, an essay on some aspect of the origins of the holiday, or an essay about Peter J. McGuire.
Young scholars study the role Oklahoma's wheat fields played in the history of labor movements in the US. They write imaginary letters describing their experiences on a wheat harvest. They research on the internet or in encyclopedias to find out how hobo sandwiches got their name.
Trace the industrial changes and shifts in world power occurring between 1850 and 1900. This is an extensive, well-organized, and complete look at the social and political events leading up to the turn of the century. A great resource to set the stage for American industrialization, WWI, and WWII. Note: The slides are text heavy and lack images, but are still a great tool.
Middle schoolers study the history of the labor movement in the US by exploring the history of the International Longshore and Warehouse Union. They examine idea of unionization and apply it to solve a problem in the workplace.
Middle schoolers read about the history of Labor Day in a newspaper article. They discuss difficulties American employees of the past had to face, learn about labor rallies, and conduct Internet research. Part of the intention of this lesson plan is to demonstrate how to cite websites in a bibliography. Because of the timing of this holiday and the importance of citing websites, this would be an outstanding lesson plan to complete upon returning to school at the beginning of the year.
Students evaluate the role labor groups had on the U.S. Government in the early 1900's.  In this teaching American history lesson, students complete several activities, including response writing and listening to music, that reinforce what the have learned about early 20th Century labor movements.
Tenth graders write a position paper siding with either management or labor on the issue of working conditions discussed in the films, book, and class discussion.
Young scholars investigate the working conditions during the Age of Industrialization. They research how workers reacted to the conditions and discuss the results of labor movement.
Eighth graders consider how immigration impacted the East. In this West Virginia history lesson, 8th graders research the effects of immigration on Wheeling, West Virginia. Students also gather information about immigration on a field trip to the West Virginia State History Museum. Students use their findings to produce videos that highlight the immigrant experience.
Groups reserach and write about topics given to them by their teacher dealing with the Bill of Rights.

Browse by Subject


Labor movement