Longitude Teacher Resources

Find Longitude educational ideas and activities

Showing 21 - 40 of 1,287 resources
Second graders use latitude and longitude coordinates to pinpoint an exact location on the map. In this geography lesson, 2nd graders utilize handouts from the Maritime Museum in order to gain practice in finding locations throughout the world.
Sixth graders identify at least ten places on the world map using given longitude and latitude points. They identify the longitude and latitude of ten places on the world map.
Students find latitude and longitude on a map or atlas. They create maps with a cruise route. They practice plotting locations given latitiude and longitude.
Young scholars analyze Columbus' rationale for sailing west, and find the latitude and longitude of modern and ancient place names.
Students define and use "absolute location," latitude, and longitude. They locate on a map or globe the Earth's poles, circles, tropics, and beginning points of measurements for latitude and longitude.
Pinhead Patty takes us around the globe and explains what latitude and longitude are in this entertaining video. The author uses an orange to demonstrate the line measurements on a sphere.
World heritage sites can be found around the globe. Many of these sites are noted for their importance in representing culture and location. Each activity included in this resource focuses on latitude/longitude, map skills, finding locations with coordinates, and discussing the importance of historic site preservation. The lesson includes a video, web links, and several handouts, as well as vocabulary and teaching notes. 
Pupils investigate how to track satellites using latitude and longitude. They investigate what man learns from all the satellites currently being studied today. Students analyze the four basic types of satellite orbits.
Challenge your learners to wrap graph paper around a ping pong ball to represent the latitude and longitude of the earth. It just can't be done! But it's a great introduction to latitude and longitude. It can be looked at in two-dimensional form like looking at a map. This can be related to the Cartesian coordinate plane. It can also be looked at in three-dimensional form like on a globe. A great hands-on activity to learn about latitude and longitude.
Students use latitude and longitude to map the path of the Battle of Gettysburg.
Learners take a look at the local newspaper and focus on the weather section. They get into small groups, and each one looks at the same map, but of a different part of the country. They must prepare a presentation that shows how latitude and longitude affect the weather patterns in three different cities. The groups present their findings to the class, and everyone discusses how latitude and longitude can be used to help predict the weather.
In this longitude and latitude worksheet, students read about both, then answer 3 questions related to examples shown and what they have read. Houghton Mifflin text is referenced.
Fifth graders explore places visited by Lewis and Clark. In this geographical concepts lesson, 5th graders plot places on a map and put events in chronological order. Students find locations on a map using longitude and latitude. Students create a map with written directions to get to Monticello.
Students use longitude and latitude to locate various cities, regions, landforms, and bodies of water around the globe. They use The New York Times Learning Network's crossword puzzle 'Longitude and Latitude' to sharpen their atlas skills.
Students explore the global grid system. In this globe lesson, students identify latitude and longitude lines and how these can tell the coordinates of any place. They use the Internet to find the exact coordinates for their town. 
Learners move themselves around a "world" map on the classroom floor, using lines of latitude and longitude to locate specific spots. They determine the locations of 11 countries where Peace Corps Volunteers are serving and identify in which continent the country is located.
Students tear paper into representative continent shapes and configure them with world oceans through relative location, direction and latitude and longitude starting points. They recognize the shape of the continents. Students recognize the location of the continents with respect to each other and the Prime Meridian and the Eqautor. Students identify the continents and major world oceans by name.
Students use Cartesian coordinates or degrees of latitude and longitude to locate important locations within their specific countries. They Use a grid to apply the concept of latitude and longitude, or positive and negative Cartesian coordinates, to determine the position of an object in the room.
Learners evaluate earth science by examining maps in class. In this world geography lesson, students examine a spherical map and identify several important locations including the prime meridian, Antarctic Circle and tropic of Cancer. Learners complete a worksheet based upon latitude and longitude coordinates and tsunami awareness.
Fifth graders examine the geographic concept of absolute location. Using a variety of resources, they create a life-size classroom grid and locate the coordinates of a point, identify latitude and longitude of different locations, and create a mini-model of the globe using latitude and longitude lines.

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