Lorraine Hansberry Teacher Resources

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Students read the play A Raisin in the Sun by Lorraine Hansberry and discuss "The American Dream" and explore how the social, educational, economical and political climate of the 1950's affected African Americans' quest for "The American Dream".
Students explore the contributions of African Americans of the 20th century. In this African American history lesson, students examine portraits of Muhammad Ali, Romare Bearden, Lorraine Hansberry, Judith Jamison, and Leontyne Price in efforts to analyze the images and make inferences prior to discovering their individual contributions.
Young scholars translate the print based content of the play by utilizing mixed media skills to communicate an argument. In this play translation lesson, students analyze and translate the play A Raisin in the Sun and explore themes from the play in a photo essay.
Students write a biopoem. In this literature and poetry writing lesson, students write a biopoem about the characters in A Raisin in the Sun by Lorraine Hansberry following a specific given format. Examples and format are included.
Young scholars read and discuss the play, A Raisin in the Sun. they focus on literary aspects of the nplay, as well as the concept of The American Dream.
Students use the play "A Raisin in the Sun" as  part of analysis of the American Dream. In this play analysis instructional activity, students define 'The American Dream' and recognize the historical setting of the play. Students identify forms of discrimination in the Jim Crow era and read poems by Langston Hughes. Students analyze the play and complete writing assignments using the given prompts.
Students explore the contributions of African Americans of the 20th century. In this African American history lesson plan, students examine portraits of Muhammad Ali, Romare Bearden, Lorraine Hansberry, Judith Jamison, and Leontyne Price in efforts to analyze the images and make inferences prior to discovering their individual contributions.
In this online interactive literature worksheet, students respond to 9 short answer and essay questions about Lorraine Hansberry's A Raisin in the SunStudents may check some of their answers online.
Learners read the play, A Raisin in the Sun to examine the role of slaves in the Civil War. They discover the role of immigrants in the United States and how that relates to the African Americans migrating north. They participate in activties and work together to gather information about the time period.
Young scholars predict outcomes of a text. In this comprehension strategy lesson, students read a poem and compare it to the play A Raisin in the Sun. Young scholars discuss their similarities and the power of dreams.
Students form opinions. For this pre-reading activity for A Raisin in the Sun) lesson, students consider different statements and decide what they think of the statement. They share their ideas as a class and discuss all sides to a idea. This lesson includes the statements and worksheets to go with this lesson.
In this online interactive reading comprehension worksheet, students respond to 25 multiple choice questions about Lorraine Hansberry's A Raisin in the SunStudents may submit their answers to be scored.
Students listen to the lyrics of modern songs by Arrested Development, Lauryn Hill, and others to enhance their study and to connect to characters, conflicts, and themes of the play, A Raisin in the Sun.
Try out a packet of poetry materials to kick-start a poetry unit. Made up of poetry written by black poets, this resource provides three themed sections (family and friends, sports, and dreams) that can be used however you see fit. Each section includes a main poem, background information about the topic and poem, discussion questions, activities, and additional poems that relate to the theme of the section.
The crossroads-and the decisions made and entities met there-are a common theme in literature, pushing readers to examine the choices and encounters that shape life experience. The theme has also been explored in blues music, most famously by Robert Johns
Examine Erikson's chart on the various stages one goes through growing up. Individually, they write a paper on whether or not they fit into those categories and how they are different today. In groups, for each stage they role play the role of someone in that stage in front of the class.
In this literature worksheet, students respond to 15 short answer and essay questions about Angelou's I Know Why the Caged Bird SingsStudents may also link to an online interactive quiz on the novel at the bottom of the page.
Young scholars compare and contrast African-American, Asian-American, Chicano and Native-American movements with the civil rights movement and are exposed to the sociopolitical and economic factors involved in the rise of social movements.
Students discover how blues music has inspired many writers and artists such as the poet, Langston Hughes. They write an essay comparing a blues song and a poem, and exploring the literary elements in both.
Students explore the life and works of black American playwrights to gain insight into how their works reflect and influence the black American experience.

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Lorraine Hansberry