Marbling Teacher Resources

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Showing 121 - 140 of 180 resources
Students compare and contrast Buddhist sculpture in varying materials through in-class discussions and small cooperative learning groups. This lesson includes possible lesson extensions.
Students discover which elements are most threatening to outdoor sculptures. In groups, they determine the steps that are needed to preserve them. They locate and assess the condition of those sculptures in their local community. They develop a presentation and share them with members of the community.
Pupils consider the ways that sculptors have represented concepts and ideals as symbolic forms in three dimensions. They compare historical examples to those in contemporary culture, and begin sketching designs for their own symbolic sculpture.
Students review multiple ideas for creating a self portrait including abstract versions, PowerPoint presentations, sculptures, ceramic plates, photography and shadow boxes. They create self portraits.
Third graders view artwork by Robert Harris of landscapes and mountains. Using a map, they locate and identify the physical features of the Canadian province they live in. In groups, they use one of his paintings and add music to symbolize the scene.
In this encyclopedia worksheet, students study the three pictures of the online encyclopedias. Students then answer a series of questions about the last encyclopedia.
Young scholars blend while Crayola Model Magic wth color from Crayola Washable Markers. They knead the color into the model magic for desired effect. They apply the model magic to a small recycled plastic containter. They decorate the bottle with craft items or plastic jewels.
Eighth graders build an Animated Gif using the Unfreeze Program, MS Paint and MS Power Point about the different phases and specific processes that occur in the Rock Cycle. They reflect in their science journals the learning that took place.
“It was a dark and stormy night.” Thus begins the 1830 novel Paul Clifford and, of course, all of Snoopy’s novels! Encourage young writers to craft settings for their stories that go beyond Edward Bulwer-Lytton’s often-mocked phrase with a series of exercises. Additional examples of great introductory settings can be found in the paperback series It Was a dark and Stormy Night. Consider having class members check out the Bulwer-Lytton Fiction Contest that awards prizes for the worst beginnings.  
Sculptures are wonderful to look at and they capture a moment in time like no other medium. Learners discuss and discover the life of artist Edmonia Wildfire Lewis and her piece Forever Free. A series of five interesting and creative activities are suggested to accompany this or any other lesson on sculpture. 
While this first appears to be a description of 20 poetry activities, it is actually the introduction, rationale, and explanation of the activities and one sample lesson for "Nothing Gold Can Stay" by Robert Frost. After a copy of the poem, you will find a nice instructional sequence that focuses on sound, figurative language, and theme. Related poems are listed and a graphic organizer is provided to use in small groups. Tip: Pair this lesson with your study of The Outsiders.
After challenging themselves to correctly choose the form of erosion and length of time required for a given landform to develop, earth science class members model mechanical and chemical weathering with various lab demonstrations over two days' time. Video clips of erosion processes occurring in the Hawaiian islands can be shown, and the lesson can be concluded with an included Jeopardy review. Though the publisher states that the lesson was designed for high schoolers, it seems to be more appropriate for upper-elementary to middle school earth science classes.
“What do you mean that my language is improper?” Prior to My Fair Lady was Pygmalion. Fair Eliza’s struggles with English, which according to George Bernard Shaw “is not accessible even to Englishmen,” come alive in the 1938 film version of Shaw’s play. The film, which won the Academy Award for Best Adapted Screenplay, provides great discussion topics, from perceptions of social status based on accent, to gender equality. 
Demonstrate to your middle school science learners how chalk breaks down in a weak acid. Discuss what affects acidic rain might have on ecosystems. Lab groups then choose one of two questions: "How does acid precipitation affect an aquatic ecosystem?" or "How does acid precipitation affect terrestrial ecosystems?" They work together to design and perform an experiment to answer their question. This is a stellar lesson on acid rain, and it reinforces practice of lab skills and the scientific process.
Advanced chemistry kids experiment with the freezing and boiling points of various aqueous solutions. They also prepare a presentation of the kinetics of solution formation and structure of the matter involved. This resource provides you, as the teacher, with detailed laboratory instructions as well as extensive background information. You will need to design laboratory sheets so that learners will have instructions on-hand. 
Students explore force and motion through a series of experiments. In this physics instructional activity, students create and interpret speed graphs. They build an electromagnet and explain the factors affecting its strength.
Students are introduced to the causes of plate movements and the hazards they present. They plot the location of 50 earthquakes and 50 volcanic eruptions on a map and explore the relationships between plate tectonics, earthquakes, and volcanoes. In the final activity, they test the effect of volcanic gases on the growth of plants.
Students analyze different perspectives of the history of the Holocaust. They experience primary and secondary sources along with pieces from literature, documentaries, songs and letters. A commitment of honor and dedication is expressed through the thoughts and feelings experienced by the survivors of the Holocaust viewed in this lesson.
Second graders explain the relationship between energy and work. For this technology lesson, 2nd graders describe the different uses of machines in their everyday lives. They record observations and data in their science journal.
Students investigate the concept of structures and how they are used in nature and the world of human civilization. The structures have various types and functions that are identified. They create mechanisms to help move objects during simple lab projects.

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