Miles Davis Teacher Resources

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Young scholars compare versions of the song, "So What," recorded by Miles Davis and Marcus Miller. They explore the Ken Burns Website to discover more about Davis and journal their thoughts about him and his music.
Young scholars examine the George Gershwin opera, "Porgy and Bess." The rhythms to some of the musical pieces are mimicked and identified as belonging to the music of jazz.
High schoolers will learn to appreciate the civil rights movement with a focus on Little Rock, Arkansas. They will also acknowledge Louis Armstrong's unparalleled contributions to American music.
After a review of comma rules, young grammarians correct 16 sentences by inserting commas where they are necessary. An answer key is provided.
Students discuss how color construct meaning in art. They will demonstrate a technical knowledge and creative use of formal elements and principals of design. Students then discuss the way their selection of color contributed to their work.
Are literature and jazz dangerous as Jazz Master Paquito D'Rivera contends? To establish the cultural and historical context of Fahrenheit 451, class members read a short essay about the 1950s and listen to classic jazz artists.
Students use the correct music terminology to evaluate a performance, composition, and arrangement of the song "Blinded by the Light" by Bruce Springsteen and compare it to another version recorded by Manfred Man.
Sixth graders make a two column chart listing ten African Americans in one column and their detailed contribution to our society in the second column. Then, they select one of the famous African Americans to research and then create a six slide PowerPoint presentation according to the criteria in the handout provided. Finally, 6th graders write a one-page personal narrative regarding their knowledge and opinions of discrimination.
Students determine that thriving African cultures engaged in international trade and exploration before the emergence of European civilization. The study ancient Ghana, its geographic locale, the diversity therein to include its people, their lifestyles, languages, and customs.
Students examine the role music played in African American history and research events of the Civil Rights movement.
Young scholars define discrimination and what its like to be a stranger.In this discrimination lesson, students research the lives of Vivien Thomas and Hamilton Naki. Young scholars produce a wall display showing how they've overcome discrimination.
The music of the Harlem Renaissance can provide a way for students to learn about musicians like Dizzy Gillespie and Louis Armstrong.
Learn about each of the major players that contributed to each genre of modern/contemporary music. This slideshow covers the last 100 years in American music, from Gershwin to Michael Jackson, Folk to Reggae. Tip: It would be great to incorporate a few music clips so that children who haven't been exposed to these genres can understand the musical progression better. 
High schoolers examine the history of blues music and discover how it relates to the music of today. As a class, they listen to the drum songs of Africa and compare it to the use of drums in pop music today. Using the internet, they research the history of the blues and its early artists. To end the instructional activity, they write in their journals to reflect on the music.
High schoolers examine influences on the creation and development of music.
Students define the community of Harlem. They explain the growth of music in this area and identify important people who spearheaded this movement. They identify places where music grew in Harlem and establish a visual as well as an aural account of the musical history of this era.
Students view images of Warhol/Basquiat collaboration and discuss them using the questions listed in the lesson plan. They work in groups to choose a theme or topic relating to American culture and discuss ideas about symbols that could be used to represent their ideas. Students ust the internet to find images, symbols and words to include on their artwork. Each group creates an artwork.
Students explore their own responses to sound by hearing the music as a regular part of the class structure. They develop an awareness that certain art evokes certain sounds and moods and develop an intuitive responses to the music.
Sixth graders work on developing language skills by listening and speaking. In this listening and speaking lesson set, 6th graders use Phil Mendez's, The Black Snowman, to work on oral language, concepts of print, fluency, spelling, vocabulary, comprehension and writing. They study vocabulary and print concepts in this two to three week unit.
Students research three African-American musicians and compose a report based upon their research in this Music Appreciation lesson plan for the middle level classroom. The lesson plan could be adapted for various student levels and abilities.

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