Military History Teacher Resources

Find Military History educational ideas and activities

Showing 1 - 20 of 105 resources
Young scholars study the key figures in African-American military history. They discover how African-American military history reflect both discrimination and the often heroic struggle to overcome discrimination. They examine the key periods of progress in African-American military history.
Students analyze historical perspectives. In this Reconstruction activity, students compare and contrast the Northern and Southern views on Reconstruction as they analyze letters from Robert E. Lee and read Confederate Military History.
The battle at the Alamo may be one of the most famous military campaigns in Texas history, but it is by no means the only one. As part of their study of the military history of Texas, class members research less-well-known sites, locate them on a map, and prepare a presentation about the instillation and its importance.
Students explore the many roles Hispanic military heroes play in the building of the United States.In this lesson students examine Hispanic participation in wars-- from the war for independence through Vietnam.
Students explore examples of ancient warfare and discuss the various uses of ancient military technologies. Students investigate the origins of biological and chemical weapons and create a classroom exhibit depicting technology and strategies used during ancient battles.
Before one can understand the military tactics practiced throughout history, he needs to become familiarized with tactics practiced in the ancient past. Learners take a critical look at the military logistics used by Alexander the Great as he conquered Asia Minor and India, and how Scipio Africanus took New Carthage from Hannibal. The lesson culminates with a research paper or presentation and a self -assessment activity. Th lesson has excellent resources, is well written, and builds a solid foundation for later learning.
In this language skills worksheet, students read an article on Anzac Day. Students respond to 6 matching questions, 29 fill in the blank questions, 30 multiple choice questions, 12 word scramble questions, 30 short answer questions, 1 graphic organizer question, and 1 essay question regarding the content of the article.
Students identify and research various women and their roles in military history. They describe how modern political positions are affected by differences in ideologies and viewpoints that have developed over time. Finally, students select a different famous military woman to research and report on.
Students examine how the Chinese and Japanese used art and literature to bolster the legitimacy of military regimes. The lesson concludes with small group Powerpoint presentations.
Did Roosevelt know about the planned attack on Pearl Harbor prior to December 7, 1941? After examining primary and secondary source materials, viewing documentary footage on the attack, a History Channel video on the controversy, and engaging in group and full class discussions, individuals present their response to the central question as an argumentative essay.
Students explore the ethnic diversity of the British military. In this diversity lesson, students discuss the British West Indies Regiment rebellion and the reasons they believed it took place. Students also study the Victoria Cross and examine its significance.
Don't be put off by the fact that the World War I propaganda posters in this packet are Canadian and some of them are even in French. All the better, in fact, to see the techniques. The richly detailed plan has instructors model analyzing basic propaganda techniques in a poster and then guiding learners through the process before individuals design their own World War I poster. US World War I posters are available from the World War I Museum at Liberty Memorial.
While many may imagine the Mongols stereotypically as a barbarian and brutal people, Mr. Green invites his audiences to consider the complexity and impact of this once great empire. This episode covers the benefits, consequences, and lasting impact of the Mongol empire, from Genghis Khan's rise to power, to the development of increased communication and trade throughout Eurasia as a result of Mongol conquests.
Was the atomic bombing of Japan ethical? After crafting a personal journal response to the question, class members are assigned a position and provided with primary source documents that prepare them to engage in a "Structured Academic Controversy." At the conclusion of the debate, individuals revisit their initial stance, and using evidence from the source material, craft a formal position paper on the question.
No need to look any further. This resource has everything for a solid exploration of the role of African Americans in the Vietnam War. Class members read primary sources, including a Martin Luther King speech, political cartoons of the era, as well as a comic book. All of the discussion questions are included as are the materials. In the end, 11th graders create an informational flyer for King's April 4th, 1967 speech. It includes a synthesis of information they learned throughout.
Students identify and examine four heroes from history and imaginative literature. They discuss the characteristics of a hero and share perceptions of what makes a hero. By comparing and analyzing a few historical and literary figures, the students incorporate the concepts of heroism into their psyches.
Students identify several important events that led to U.S. involvement in World War I. They examine different explanations, form an opinion about the evidence for each rationale and then create a slideshow to present their findings.
Eighth graders research a variety of military statistics while using the theme of Remebering Our Veterans. They use data management to plan and create a PowerPoint presentation with their findings. They incorporate different types of data displays to show off their analysis.
Students are introduced to the experiences of thousands of Hispanics during World War II. After watching an excerpt from "The War", they work together in groups to research more in depth their different experiences. They compare and contrast the Hispanic experience with other minority groups during the war.
Students research the sinking of the Lusitania. They work together to develop a position supporting an idea. They discover principles of international law and the rights of non-combatants in wartime.