Napoleon Bonaparte Teacher Resources

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A timeline of the main events in Napoleon's career (starting in 1799) begins this video, which details the War of the Third Coalition and the transition of the Holy Roman Empire into the Confederation of the Rhine. Maps, paintings, and annotations will make this lecture appealing to your students as they learn about Napoleon's incredible rise to the position of Emperor, and therefore, near-invincibility. Strategies of the war from all perspectives help to round out this chapter in history.
This resource is rich with primary and secondary source material regarding major events in the Atlantic world during the Age of Revolution. While there are suggested classroom activities toward the beginning of the resource, its true value lies in the reproductions of such major historical documents as the United States Declaration of Independence, the Haitian Declaration of Independence, and the United Nations Universal Declaration of Human Rights. Use the sentence frames in the Classroom Guide as a solid framework for considering the theme of freedom and what it means to different individuals as you review the instructional materials.
Here's a instructional activity to help your class envision the Lewis and Clark expedition. Your young historians read a one-page article on the expedition, use context clues and a dictionary to define eight terms from the article and write a subtitle for each of the five paragraphs in the article. They imagine they are members of the Corps of Discovery and write a letter to a family member on their trip through the west.
1848 was a hot year for Europe, which endured political tumult and upheaval after years of tension buildup. This presentation details the circumstances surrounding revolutions in France, Austria-Hungary, Romania, Italy, Prussia, and Germany. The final slides detail the aftermath that led directly into the events of the upcoming 20th century.
If you're looking for a description of the major happenings of the presidencies of both Thomas Jefferson and James Madison, then this is the resource for you. Similar to a textbook reading, this worksheet offers a great deal of information and is followed by a few assessment questions to check for understanding. It can be assigned as an independent reading or homework assignment, but you may wish to jigsaw the material or ask clarifying questions along the way if done as a whole-group reading activity.
What do the members of your class already know about world history? This is a fabulous pre-assessment that will illustrate the varying levels of general world history knowledge among your young historians that you can use to inform your instruction accordingly. Questions involve a range of ideas, from correctly placing important persons and events within the appropriate time frame to listing religions of the world. Tip: Include some time for learners to list as many other world history facts or insights they can recall.
Young scholars connect the symbols from the design of the United States Mint Fifty State Quarters Program to our country's history in this five-lesson unit. The culture, unique heritage, and geography of the individual states are probed.
Scholars apply the basic ideas of Mohandis Gandhi and their application in global change. They generate original definitions of violence and nonviolence.  They then create their own set of basic rules that they can apply in real life. 
Celebrate the anniversary of one of the United States' most important land acquisitions with a fun worksheet. The class answers five matching questions related to those involved with the Louisiana Purchase and then think about what life would be like today if France still had control of Louisiana.
Learners practice the habits of good readers in the content area of science. While reading a brief article about leeches, they compare and contrast the material read with other information they have encountered.
Young scholars identify and examine four heroes from history and imaginative literature. They discuss the characteristics of a hero and share perceptions of what makes a hero. By comparing and analyzing a few historical and literary figures, the students incorporate the concepts of heroism into their psyches.
For any teacher of American History, The Lewis and Clark Expedition is a watershed event that should be shared with your students. This is a very good lesson on the Expedition, and the events that led up to it; including The Lousisiana Purchase. Learners engage in streamed video, hands-on activities, and cooperative learning in order to gain an understanding of one of the most amazing journeys ever taken.
A teacher's guide for a seminar held at the Cincinnati Art Museum includes a full description of several Pre-Raphaelite art pieces, artists, and connecting literary works. Excerpts from authors and poets can help you make the connection between art and literature for your class.
A lot happened to European economics, policy, and social systems after WWII. This 24 page social studies packet provides images, reading passages, comprehension questions, and critical thinking questions regarding all things Europe from  1945-1980. Extensive, complete, and well worth your time. 
In this Historical Facts worksheet, students read a passage about the Louisiana Purchase and answer 8 fill in the blank and 7 true/false questions.
Students research the expedition of Lewis and Clark. In this Lewis and Clark expedition lesson, students become familiar with the resources that Lewis and Clark found along their journey  Students view mental maps created at the time for what they can learn about the terrain of the Lewis and Clark journey.
The origins of the state of Arkansas are the focus of this history instructional activity. Elementary schoolers to high schoolers identify persons associated with the development of the state from the very first European contact to statehood in 1836. Besides outlining some great activities, this instructional activity has short biographies of many of the major players in the development of Arkansas.
Who would win an election between Napoleon and Julius Caesar? Group your class up to analyze and discuss which of their given choices would make the best presidential candidate, given specific criteria. The potential candidate list includes historical figures such as, Napoleon, Jesse Owens, Abraham Lincoln, and Julius Caesar.
Students examine Haitian culture, including its discovery, colonization, and political and economic development. Role-playing in two ethnic groups, they caucus and develop strategies for the Haitian Revolution. In learning centers, students create Haitian meals, assess the religions, and survey immigration policies.
Students brainstorm and make list of successful and funny classic TV comedy shows, discuss, in Spanish, specifics of shows on list, review biography of Mexican comedian Roberto Gomez Bolanos, and view episode of Chespirito, jotting down information about setting, characters, and sequence. Students then rewrite actions in proper sequence, compare and contrast Mexican and American television comedy, and compose and present original comedy scene.

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