Networking Teacher Resources

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Teaching tools for homeschoolers support student-centered literature study. Aimed at readers of the biography Diana: Her True Story in Her Own Words by Andrew Morton, but useful with any text, the materials are widely applicable: graphic organizers, response to literature activities, writing prompts, study guides, a reading agenda, plot flow chart, and character map. Includes link to a complete classroom-oriented lesson plan as well.
For homeschool or the classroom: response to reading activities, writing prompts, study guides, a reading schedule, plot flow chart, and character map relevant to any reading task. Resource is designated for use with Alan Paton's Cry, the Beloved Country, but these materials would work for any literary text. Links to additional study guides are included.
For homeschool or the classroom: graphic organizers, response to literature activities, writing prompts, study guides, a reading schedule, plot flow chart, and character map relevant to any reading task. Resource is designated for Laura Esquivel's Like Water for Chocolate, but these materials would work for any literary text. Also includes links to additional study support.
These teaching tools for homeschoolers support student-centered literature study. (I'd use them in my classroom.) Aimed at Arthur Miller's play The Crucible, but useful with any text, the materials are widely applicable: graphic organizers, response to literature activities, writing prompts, study guides, a reading agenda, plot flow chart, and character map. Links to the text and additional study guides don't work.
Spelling work for 3rd graders includes grade-level vocabulary and homophones tail/tale; their/there/they're; and our/hour. Practice opportunities include flashcards, drawing pictures, anagrams, copying, and 15 generic vocabulary and spelling activities from which to choose. Although designed for homeschool, these tools support any spelling practice, at home or in the classroom.
Students examine the want ads to determine their organization. They discuss a list of vocabulary generally associated with employment. They write a job announcement for a company of their own. They discuss resources other than the want ads where they might gain employment and the importance of networking with people they know.
Students produce a newsletter bringing awareness to the work of the Global Action Improvement network. In this energy awareness writing lesson plan, students write a newsletter that highlights the goal of increasing awareness of the global energy problem, and telling about the trials and successes of other groups who are passionate about the same goal. They produce a pod-cast.
For this solids worksheet, learners explain why solids are more dense than other states of matter. Students compare ionic solids and covalent network solids. This worksheet has 6 short answer questions.
Four thought-provoking questions encourage readers to develop and support their opinions about strategies to end a friendship after exploring excerpts from a New York Times article. The reading is brief so this could be a lead-in to other lessons or a unit on friendship, or it could be part of efforts to foster empathy and kindness. Lends itself to role play.
Spelling work for 3rd graders includes grade-level vocabulary words that begin with w- or wh-. Practice opportunities include flashcards, drawing pictures, anagrams, copying, and 15 generic vocabulary and spelling activities from which to choose. Although they are geared toward homeschool, these tools support any spelling practice, at home or in the classroom.
Students explore the world of social networking. In this reading skills lesson, students complete a jigsaw reading activity (the reading material is not included) regarding social networking. Students discuss the content of the reading.
Students study vocabulary in order to read an online article. They participate in word work before they read and discuss the article. They take an online quiz and a role play activity.
Students research the 1067 Newark riots and examine photographs of the riots for clues as to when they were taken and what was going on. They view different historical perspectives on the riots and then write dialogues based on the different perspectives discussed in the article.
Learners evaluate different types of reality television programming in "focus groups" and then submit their opinions on this type of programming to a television network.
Students use longitude and latitude to locate various cities, regions, landforms, and bodies of water around the globe. They use The New York Times Learning Network's crossword puzzle 'Longitude and Latitude' to sharpen their atlas skills.
Examine the features that make a good children's television show and create a pitch for a new show based on these criteria. Writers then evaluate a currently broadcast show based on criteria discussed in class. The richly detailed plan from the New York Times Learning Network also includes interdisciplinary connections and links to PBS.
The Learning Network section of the New York Times produces high-quality teaching materials. This issue gets middle or high schoolers reading an article about how people use art to express their response to high-stress events. They work in groups to craft and practice skits illustrating a tragedy and explain how it could also be formatted as a short video. This lesson is a thoughtful inclusion for your performing arts class.
The class explores and debates, from multiple perspectives, a petition to allow Hopi Indians to take golden eagle hatchlings from a federal wildlife sanctuary for use in a religious ceremony. Pupils defend their personal views on the issue by writing short speeches to present to Congress. Based on a New York Times article from the Learning Network. Update content by conducting research to find out how the issue was resolved. 
The New York Times Learning Network provides the resources that permit pupils to examine and then write and perform a fake news broadcast in the vein of “The Daily Show” or “Saturday Night Live” Weekend Update. The generated reports should reflect the class’s knowledge of understanding of both the genre of news satire and people and topics in the news.
Learners imagine what it would be like to operate a plane, train, or truck along a trade route across the United States. They also examine maps of major U.S. transportation networks and explain how specific products might get from one place to another.

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