Newfoundland and Labrador Teacher Resources

Find Newfoundland and Labrador educational ideas and activities

Showing 1 - 20 of 1,916 resources
Students examine some of the factors involved in tourist destination areas in Canada. Using the data, they determine the best location for a new Bed and Breakfast in Newfoundland.
Students research current population statistics and demographic trends in Canada. They construct graphic organizers of their research, identify potential issues arising from population trends and suggest ways in which Canada can prepare for these changes.
Students examine the political and territorial developments of Canada. Using the Canadian Atlas, they trace the territorial changes that have taken place since 1867. They use the Internet to research the political changes and representations by region.
Students analyze population data and trends in Canada over a given amount of time. As a class, they are introduced to the concept of dependency load and use a population pyramid to calculate the figure. Using the internet, they research the effects of a high dependency load on housing, taxes and jobs.
Sixth graders discover the reliance of Newfoundland and Labrador on natural resources. As a class, they examine how the development of oil provides the two regions with a future. They research and make a presentation on a related topic of their choice.
Students are introduced to the history of cod fishery by watching a video segment. As a class, they discuss how one resource can sustain a group of people living in an area at a specific time. They analyze patterns in the distribution of Canada's population and explore issues related to rural and urban environments.
Students use the Canadian Atlas to discover an inventory of Canada's wealth and usage of resources. Using charts and graphs, they produce a wall of selected data of importance to the country and identify one issue of sustainability. They present their information to the class in groups after categorizing the data.
What is a philanthropist? We can all be philanthropists! After assessing the needs of the school and listening to literature about how they can help others, primary learners develop a class project and maintain a journal of their progress and project results. Then these young difference-makers write and present a book or newsletter showing their accomplishments and presenting their opinions.
Learn about the destruction of the rainforest by analyzing statistics. Young learners make an original line graph showing destruction in the rainforest. Additional activities include a collage, a sequencing of the book The Lorax, collecting facts from fact cards, and describing the role of those concerned.
“Humanscape No.65” by Melesia Casas and Ester Hernandez’s “Sun Maid Raisins” launch a study of how works of art can advocate for social change. After examining these two works and discussing the human rights issues raised, class members are encouraged to create their own advocacy graphic. Learning links, reflections, service opportunities, and worksheets are included in the richly detailed plan. 
How do you feel when you get a compliment? Give a compliment? After modeling how to make explicit compliments (“I like the way . . .”) ask class members to practice saying nice things about themselves and others, and to consider how these comments make them feel. Individuals then examine their reflection in a mirror as they give and receive kind words, and reproduce these expressions on a paper plate face.
Are you looking for a cross-curricular activity between science and language arts, or a writing project for your environmental science class? Examine water as a scarce natural resource instead of taking it for granted. Middle schoolers identify the traits of potable water, and research local water sources to determine if they are impaired or not.
Help your class explore the question "Is it ever right to disobey a law?" With a strong base of knowledge about the Civil War, anti-slavery movement, and Underground Railroad, your class explores civil disobedience in Marshall, Michigan in response to the Fugitive Slave Law. Resource suggests relevant historical fiction appropriate for fourth graders, along with recommendations for informational texts and websites. Dyads discuss the question. Whole group share completes the session. 
High school freshmen search for examples of justice, kindness, peace, and tolerance in news media, and brainstorm how they can promote these attributes in their school, community, and world. Directions for a role-play activity, a vocabulary list, and cross-curriculum extensions are included.
Learn about philanthropy and poetic conventions with an inclusive lesson about Bill Gates. After learning about Mr. Gates' humanitarian efforts in the world, sixth graders use alliteration, onomatopoeia, rhyme, rhythm, and refrain in their own poems about philanthropy. Use this lesson in a unit about humanitarianism, or with articles about other non-profit organizations.
Young community members explore philanthropic foundations. They discuss the work of community foundations, and then they listen to a guest speaker describe the vision and activities of a local foundation. Is there a way they can join the foundation for a fieldtrip? 
Help your pupils learn how to problem-solve through role-playing activities. Small groups brainstorm ideas of common conflicts and present their skits to the class. They can present their skits to other classes to promote the common good.
Mem Fox’s Wilfrid Gordon McDonald Partridge provides the labels for a graphing activity. Class members create an illustration of a memory item brought from home, and place their illustration in the proper column of a graph. When the graph is complete, the class evaluates the data collected. Extension activities include creating story problems using the data and creating a new graph.
What is the difference between a news story and a personal narrative? This plan has learners write a personal narrative using the topic of service projects in their community. Consider completing a cross-curricular extension by bringing in a speaker or sketching scenes to accompany the narrative. 
After identifying the parts of a persuasive piece of writing, young writers explore different prewriting activities for the persuasive essay. They have the option to write a news article, personal narrative, or persuasive essay to describe a personal service experience. Middle schoolers appreciate getting to choose their own assignment! 

Browse by Subject


Newfoundland and Labrador