Ocean Teacher Resources

Find Ocean educational ideas and activities

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Students identify and locate the continents and oceans. In this continent and ocean geography lesson, students use Visual Thesaurus to define continents and oceans and use information from the site to label the continents and oceans on a worksheet.
Students explore world mapping skills. In this world geography lesson plan, students identify and label the continents and oceans on a world map using the Visual Thesaurus. Students generate mnemonic devices to help memorize these terms.
The ocean is full of natural resources and its expanses reach every shore. Who has rights to those resources and how should they be distributed? The class is divided into groups, each representing a different country who has its sights on the resources of the North Sea. Each group maps out and determines rules for dispersing the ocean's wealth, while sustaining it in an environmentally sensitive manner. The groups present their choices and rationale to the class. They finish with a class discussion.  
A rap, a song, an activity, a presentation, and teaching notes are yours for the taking! Teaching the five themes of geography will be a snap with a handy resource like this one. Learners will be introduced to the importance of understanding geography through movement, people, locations, places, and regions by engaging in two fun small group activities. Everything needed is embedded or easily downloadable.
As an introduction to a unit on oceans, get youngsters thinking about why it is important to us as humans. Using a map-making website, they identify where the products that they use come from. They also make connections to show how they, in turn, affect oceans. This activity provides a visual to impress how we are all connected to the ocean whether or not we live near one.
Dora, Dora, Dora, Dora, Dora! This may be your little ones' best guess as to what it's like to be an explorer! Give them a deeper understanding with this compact examination. A four-minute video introduces them to Robert Ballard, the oceanographer most known for finding the sunken Titanic and hydrothermal vents. Afterward, divide the class into groups and give them each a portion of the world map (included). They draw what they think might be found in their parts of the ocean and then put their section together with the rest of the class. More than anything, this lesson can be used to whet learners' appetites for an oceanography unit.
Students explore oceanography by participating in a flash card activity. In this ocean inhabitant lesson, students define a list of ocean related vocabulary terms and answer ocean geography study questions. Students utilize organism flash cards to practice memorizing animal characteristics and facts.
Help your class to understand the concept of the one world ocean by first asking them to draw the ocean boundaries. Discuss the challenges this presents in terms of sharing the oceans and the resources contained. That is all there is to this lesson. It is brief, but the topic is stimulating and can be used as a part of your oceanography or social studies curriculum. 
Learners study the nesting process of the loggerhead turtle. They watch a video clip that shows them how human influences, such as artificial lights, can disorient turtle hatchlings, which can keep them from reaching the ocean. They work together to identify ways that people can reduce threats to the loggerhead habitat. A terrific science lesson, designed for sixth through twelfth graders. Note that the handouts are not included and that you will have to do an Internet search to find the videos, but there is plenty of useful material.
Students examine the types of organisms found in oceans. In groups, they read articles about the research done at certain sites. They work together to research their own water ecosystems and report the findings to the class. To end the lesson, they also observe the behaviors of dolphins.
Young scholars investigate how ocean currents affect our world. In this ocean currents lesson, students perform an experiment to show how cold water is near the poles and warm water is near the equator. Young scholars use water, food coloring, ice cubes, and a baking dish to perform the experiment. Students create a report with their results, diagrams and an explanation.
A fabulous presentation/activity based on geography. The author has designed a "baseball game" where batters advance to the next base if they correctly answer a multiple choice question about geography. Geographic terms are used, along with a wide variety of other geographic skills. Very nice!
Geography lesson plans using Google Earth, or other interactive websites can make this topic current and interesting for students.
Students discuss the seven continents of Earth and the diverse geography. After discussion, they create their own paper-mache globes which properly display all seven continents, the equator, and the prime meridian. They conduct research about the seven continents and examine maps before completing the project.
Students gain a deeper understanding of both geography and the Revolutionary War. They practice using on line research in examining historical events and using political, physical, and topographic maps.
You won't get lost, after learning map skills during Geography Awareness Week.
Here is a great way to pique your students' interest in geography, and help them learn about their world.
Second graders demonstrate their ability to find the five oceans on a globe and on a world map and relate their knowledge of mountains and other physical characteristics of land masses to the physical characteristics of the ocean floor.
Students explore Korean geography. In this Korea instructional activity, students examine maps and handouts on major geographic features of Korea and investigate the advantages and disadvantages of Korea's geography.
Students work in groups, each group mixes food dye into water, pouring the water into an ice cube tray, and freezing it. They are shown a globe and students observe that all the oceans on Earth are connected to form one "world ocean." Students fill a clear baking dish with warm tap water to represent the warm water near the equator. They observe the cold water sinks and moves along the bottom of the baking dish toward the warmer water in the middle.