Order (Biology) Teacher Resources

Find Order (Biology) educational ideas and activities

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Youngsters create a list of grocery store items and then work together to categorize them as if they were setting up the shelves of the market. Then they are given a box of miscellaneous objects to practice categorizing. With these two experiences under their belts, you can then introduce them to the biological classification system and the use of a dichotomous key for identifying unknown organisms. The instructional activity is specific to Kentucky wildlife, but can easily be adapted no matter where you live. 
Seventh graders explain the importance of taxonomy. In this biology lesson, 7th graders classify organisms accordingly. They develop a mnemonic to help them remember taxonomy levels.
Tenth graders are introduced to the the use of similarities and differences in the classification process. Students will then learn how biological classification represents how organisms are related, with species being the most fundamental unit of the classification system.
Check this out! Part two of a set of slide shows about biological classification; this one zooms in on kindgom plantae and kingdom animalia. Attractive and informational slides cover details that make this most appropriate for advanced biology learners. Not only do they address general characteristics of each kingdom, they touch on reproduction, seed structure, symmetry, evolutionary trends, body cavity formation and embryo development. This may end up being your most preferred presentation!
In this classification worksheet, students will look at how biological classification began and how scientific names are used in biology. Students will use a table showing the classification of four organisms to answer 10 short answer questions. This worksheet also contains 6 matching questions and 9 true or false questions.
Middle schoolers explore diverse forms of life by using modern biological classification systems to group animals that are related. Students then study basic scientific groupings like genus, species, mammals, fish, birds, amphibians, and reptiles, and pair different vertebrate animals, identifying their common traits.
The author of this presentation elaborates on the details of insect classification, information apparently required to become a master gardener in the horticulture program at Oregon State University. Though lengthy (110 slides), it is an outstanding collection of photos, graphs, and diagrams to educate the viewer in basic entomology. Not only could this be used as a resource for horticulture classes, it can even stand as an introduction to a college entomology course. 
Three lessons and five assessments are contained in this material. Various paper shapes are sorted as a simulation of biological classification. Learners gather a list of living things that they are familiar with and design a classification system for them. The third lesson plan in the series focuses on the outdated kingdom Monera. As long as you teach the more current name for the bacteria, the culturing and examination in this activity is applicable to the taxonomy theme. 
Students compare the different classifications and explore how organisms are grouped.  In this classification instructional activity students study images of organisms and answer questions. 
Learners examine and analyze a poster that presents various types of animals throughout the ages. They determine biological classification with fossils and earth history in a game.
Environmental science enthusiasts show what they know at the end of the year by taking this full-fledged final exam. They answer multiple choice, graph interpretation, and essay analysys questions, 73 of them in all. Topics range from cell structure and function to population ecology. This exam blows others away with the variety included!
Tenth graders explain how organisms are classified according to similarities. For this biology lesson, 10th graders research on five different organisms of their choice. They prepare a report and presentation about them which they share with the class.
Almost 100 slides explore the history of life and how it has changed over time. Full of photos and graphics, the colorful text is highly informative. You could go through these slides, pick and choose which you might want to highlight, and hide those that you don't want. Because of the extent of information here, this is a valuable resource to use when teaching evolutionary concepts to your biology classes.
Learners collect and analyze pollen from different species of plants. In small groups, they classify pollen according to shape, size and physical characteristics. They draw the basic anatomy of flowering plants and create a dichotomous key for identifying the pollen grains.
In this biology worksheet, students complete a crossword puzzle with 39 questions on taxonomy. They identify the different classification systems used in biology.
In this biology worksheet, learners identify and locate various vocabulary terms relating to the classification of living things. There are 28 biology terms located in the word search.
Students investigate the effect of temperature on cold-blooded animals, using a 5 x 8 inch index card to represent a dinosaur as their model organism. Students measure temperature changes that occurs at different angles to a light source and apply the importance of maintaining an appropriate body temperature.
Explore the concept of evolution and cell biology; your class can work in groups to use the internet to view websites on evolution, take a quiz, and complete a lab activity.
Students create a computer database to discover relationships present in the Animal Kingdom. In this classification instructional activity, students enter data into a Microsoft Access database. They answer questions on a worksheet and create a visual class presentation.
In this classification of life instructional activity, learners use an on line source to answer questions about how species are classified, named and grouped. They give the classification of a bear, an orchid and a sea cucumber.

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Order (Biology)