Parallelism Teacher Resources

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Teachers who are looking for resources to reinforce the grammatical concept of Parallel Structure should enjoy this learning exercise and the accompanying interactive activities embedded in the sheet. There are twenty sentences to complete by maintaining parallel structure when adding new information to each sentence.
Teachers who are looking for resources to reinforce the grammatical concept of Parallel Structure should enjoy this worksheet, and the accompanying interactive activities embedded in the sheet. Learners complete twenty sentences by maintaining parallel structure when adding new information to each sentence.
In this language arts worksheet, students read 6 sample sentences. They revise sentences that do not use parallel structure.
In this parallel structure worksheet, learners read about parallel structure within sentences and between sentences, then complete a practice sheet of exercising, rewriting sentences. An answer key is given.
Discuss the definition of parallel structure with your high school class. In small groups, they read a section of "The Declaration of Independence" to identify examples of parallel structure. Each learner writes an essay explaining the author's use of parallel structure.
Help your young writers improve the clarity of their sentences by showing them how to create parallel structures as they construct sentences. Two exercises give kids practice identifying the correct parallel structure and crafting parallel structures in sentences.
After reading the first reference page about parallel structure using correlative conjunctions, young learners rewrite nine sentences with errors in parallelism. Even the strongest writers in your language arts class could benefit from this helpful activity. Use the second page exercises as a homework assignment or in-class instructional activity.
In this parallel structure worksheet, students rewrite italicized parts of sentences to be parallel with the remainder of the sentence, changing/adding if necessary.
Examine parallelism in sentence structure. Ninth graders review Lincoln's Gettysburg Address to find examples of parallelism, and look at the Declaration of Independence for the same. They compose an original piece of writing in which they highlight their use of parallelism by using a different colors for the text.
In this parallel structure worksheet, students rewrite a set of 10  sentences, revising for parallel structure, then choose expressions that make sentences parallel.
Give your sentences more clarity by learning to avoid misplaced modifiers, dangling modifiers, and the passive voice. Review parallel structure as well. Plenty of examples are shown, providing utmost clarity.
Reinforce rhetorical reading with your eighth grader honors class (or standard-level high schoolers). Using quotes from American presidents and political leaders, pupils identify the rhetorical devices highlighted in each quote. Additionally, they write an essay that incorporates various elements (allusion, alliteration, repetition, parallel structure, and climax). You can use the list of books and stories at the top of the page, but the activity works just as well on its own.
When preparing students for standardized tests, this presentation about parallel structure could be a great way to review. Using concrete examples, and providing detailed explanations, students could use this as an independent review.
Tenth graders practice using writing conventions in a variety of writing situations, as well as using parallel structure. They find patterns in sentences and use writing conventions to revise a paper they have previously written.
Challenge your literary analysts with this test review sheet. Learners identify rhetorical devices and parallel structure in addition to defining literary devices and vocabulary. While there is no test included, this could be used as a guide to create a test or unit on the provided list of poems and stories, which includes "The Gettysburg Address," "O Captain! My Captain!," "I Have a Dream," and more.
Learners examine 10 pairs of sentences. Then, they identify the sentence in each pair that has parallel structure.
Practice parallel structure with a multiple-choice exercise. Twenty questions challenge learners of all ages to correctly fill in blanks with phrases that are parallel in structure to what is already there. Tip: As noted, this worksheet accompanies an interactive online exercise, but it is not necessary to do both.
As the third learning exercise in a series about parallel structure, this learning exercise continues to challenge students' writing skills. It includes twenty multiple choice questions; students must select the correct phrase to complete each sentence maintaining parallel structure.
Challenge your pupils' writing skills with this two-page worksheet. There are a total of twenty sentences which must be read in order to determine whether or not they contain errors in parallel structure. Note: This worksheet accompanies an online exercise.
How do you create parallel structure? Here, the first section details parallelism, providing many examples. The next two sections provide your class with practice opportunities. The first one requires learners to identify the sentences with correct parallels. Then, in exercise two, learners will rewrite a set of sentences using parallel structure. 

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