Plessey v. Ferguson Teacher Resources

Find Plessey v. Ferguson educational ideas and activities

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Students use primary sources and timelines to begin a study of school integration; students watch "Nantucket Rock of Changes," and compare the case of Eunice Ross with the story of the Little Rock Nine.
Music and culture are intimately linked. Ask your learners to find connections between jazz and the culture of the 1920s though a jigsaw activity and writing assignment. All pupils read one of three articles and get together in mixed groups to create posters that represent the similarities and differences between the articles. After presenting their work, class members get to work outlining and writing an essay on the same topic.
Sixth graders become familiar with the conditions of the African Americans in the Deep South during the 1950's and 1960's and Jim Crow Laws. They explain segregation and the approaches taken to desegregate.
Learners explain how the Civil War and Reconstruction both solved and created problems for our nation. They study how Reconstruction caused a further decline in relations between the North & South and how racism has been and is existent in the U.S. from slavery through the present.
Ninth graders study the American Civil Rights Movement. For this social justice lesson, 9th graders read "Making History," and discuss the decision in the Brown v. Board of Education case. Students then take the provided Civil Rights test.
Students examine two photographs of a "white" school and a "black" school. They compare the education of an African American to that of a Caucasian American. They describe the conditions for education in each of the schools in the photographs. They analyze the conditions and explain why this could or could not happen today.
Seventh graders research Supreme Court cases. They formally debate court rulings, write a scenario portraying a possible futuristic America and participate in a field practicum for media production, while evaluating various social, economic and racial conflicts that exist among America's ethnic groups.
Students investigate the culture of the post Reconstruction South. They participate in a jigsaw research activity, conduct Internet research on an assigned topic, and write a report to present to the class.
Learners review the procedures for selecting a new Supreme Court Justice. In groups, they determine which questions the nominee should be asked and practice asking the questions with a classmate. They watch the confirmation hearings and discuss their reactions.

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Plessey v. Ferguson