Prime Factorization Teacher Resources

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In this finding prime factors learning exercise, 6th graders read two strategies for finding prime factors, then practice using these methods by doing factor facts drills.
Show the class how to find the factors of numbers. They use a variety of strategies, including unifix cubes, to find the factors of a whole number. This resource includes clear procedure to follow. Included are an anticipatory set, materials list, and a link to a printable homework page.
Sixth graders explore factors and fractions. For this factors and functions lesson, 6th graders explore prime numbers, prime factorization, and divisibility rules so that are able to work with fractions. Students also practice solving problems that their instructors model.
Seventh graders practice determining the prime factorization of composite numbers. They create Christmas factor trees for prime numbers greater than 100. They decorate their final products with markers, crayons, colored pencils, glitter and glue.
Students identify numbers as prime or composite and complete prime factorization of composite numbers.
In this factorization worksheet, students prime factorize six numbers by using the factor tree method. The numbers given go up to the number 24.
In this prime factors instructional activity, students solve 12 problems. Students list the prime factors for each one or two digit number. Students tell if the numbers are prime.
In this prime factors worksheet, students solve 20 problems in which the prime factors of a one or two digit number are listed. No examples are provided.
In this prime factors activity, students solve 20 problems in which a one or two digit number is analyzed and the prime factors listed.
In this prime numbers activity, students solve 20 problems in which the prime factors for one or two digit numbers are listed. Students tell if the number is prime or composite.
For this prime factorization worksheet, students solve 12 problems in which the prime factors for the two digit numbers are listed. There are no examples.
For this algebra worksheet, learners complete a chart that finds the prime factors, prime factorization, and writing them with powers as well as interpret the chart. There 16 questions.
For this prime factorization worksheet, students list the prime factors of the 2 digit numbers given to them. Students complete 9 problems.
Equipped with several examples from the attached module and from standardized tests, Sal takes viewers through the process of prime factorization and divisibility. He demonstrates each skill several times with many different numbers, allowing them to see each step in his work.
Sal explains that the greatest common factor of any number is the largest number divisible into both monomials and not necessarily the number with greatest value. He breaks down two numbers into their prime factors as a product of its primes then identifies the GCF of greatest common factor.
Students investigate the prime factorization of composite numbers.  In this fifth and sixth grade mathematics lesson plan, students use the TI-73 calculator to find the prime factorization of a number and use that information to simplify fractions.  Students write repeated factors in exponential form.
Use prime factorization to find the greatest common factor of three given values. Okay. But what if there doesn't seem to be any integer that is common in all three given values? Well, then, the greatest common factor must be 1. Not sure what that means? Watch this video to clarify.
What is the greatest common factor of two terms in an expression? First prime factor each of the terms. Then find the factors that they have in common. Multiply if needed. That is how to find the greatest common factor. Watch the video and see for yourself.
Use prime factorization to find the greatest common factor of four given values. What are the factors that all four given values have in common? Identify them, and then multiply together to get the greatest common factor. Just like that. Watch this video to see how it's done.
Use prime factorization to find the greatest common factor of three given values. What are the factors that all three given numbers have in common? Identify them, and then multiply together to get the greatest common factor. Just like that. Watch this video to see how it's done.

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Prime Factorization