Reading Assessment Teacher Resources

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Look back at the third chapter of The Cay with your class. Pupils will conduct a close reading, taking a second look at a chunk of text and responding to a series of text-dependent questions. Wrap up with an analytical writing prompt about Phillip's relationship with his parents.
Children learn about bullying in schools while being tested on their ability to read closely and identify the main idea and supporting details of a text. Following the assessment, students participate in a chalk walk, during which they silently and anonymously address the question "How do you stop a bully from being a bully?" by writing their ideas on pieces of chart paper posted around the room. This activity provides youngsters a safe outlet for sharing their thoughts on bullying, as the class continues creating a list of rules to strengthen the school community.
Fourth graders practice their close reading skills with a short text on conflict resolution. Working in pairs, learners read and reread the article Smart Speak by Marilyn Cram Donahue as they identify the main idea and use context clues to understand challenging vocabulary. The class uses the text to begin making a list of rules to improve their school community, as they work toward the long term goal of writing a school constitution. Consider having students create skits to act out the conflict resolution strategies from the article as an extension activity. This is a great resource for teaching how to read closely, and can very easily be adapted to any piece of writing.
First graders read the book, Confetti Eggs. Working in guided reading groups, they discuss making crafts with eggs and preview the book by looking at the pictures and making predictions. After reading the book aloud, they discuss how to make confetti eggs and follow the sequence of steps involved.
Second graders read independently to find out what happens when the bus moves on its route. Students are given strategies to help with words they aren't sure how to read. Students whisper read with a partner on the second reading. As an extension activity, 2nd graders sing "The Wheels on the Bus," or draw a picture of themselves riding a bus.
Learners discuss eating and picking peaches and participate in other pre-reading activities before reading the book, Juicy Peach. They read the book independently, but are guided by directive questions from their teacher. A discussion follows, as well as repeated readings for mastery.
Students participate in pre-reading activities before reading the book, Pran's Week of Adventure. They read the book independently, but are guided by directive questions from their teacher. A discussion follows, as well as repeated readings for mastery.
Students participate in pre-reading activities before reading the book, Twister's Tricks. They read the book independently, but are guided by directive questions from their teacher. A discussion follows, as well as repeated readings for mastery.
First graders read the book, Where Is My Puppy? Working in guided reading groups, they discuss having a puppy and predict what might occur in the story. After reading the book aloud, they retell the story and locate the puppy on each page.
Students read patterned sentences. In this guided reading lesson, young readers explore patterned sentences based on familiar word families. Students generate predictions based on picture clues.
Students blend phonemes. In this guided reading lesson, students create words by blending isolated phonemes. Students read a book discussing families.
Young readers consider text-to-self connections. Learners discover the text-to-self connection as they read Flora's Box by Tina Althaide. They practice high frequency words, prepositions, and 1:1 correspondence.
Students discover basic concepts of print. In this early literacy lesson, students discover basic high frequency words. Students make predictions as they read. Cross-curricular activities provided.
Students blend phonemes to decode words. For this guided reading lesson, students evaluate different comprehension strategies to aid reading.  Students make predictions based on picture clues and use patterned sentences to facilitate reading success.
Students read patterned sentences. In this guided reading lesson, students use one to one matching and picture clues to aid comprehension. Cross-curricular activities are provided.
Students engage in discussion that examines Students feelings toward reading. They listen as the book, SIGN OF THE BEAVER by Elizabeth George Speare is read to them for enjoyment.
Students practice reading with fluency by rereading texts to increase their speed. They listen to the teacher model fluent, smooth, and expressive oral reading. They then work in a small group reading orally and self-assessing their progress.
Third graders continue to develop their reading fluency in preparation for their assessment in the tenth instructional activity of this unit. Young readers are provided with a short passage on Helen Keller, which they use while working in pairs reading and providing feedback on each other's fluency. During this practice time, the teacher selects kids to read the passage aloud in order to make audio recordings for their fluency assessment. A great opportunity is provided for documenting your class's growth as readers. If using this resource with upper graders, be sure to supplement a passage more appropriate to their reading level.
Young readers continue to strengthen their fluency skills with a text of their choosing. The teacher first engages the class with an audio recording or read-aloud of a short poem, modeling for children how to read fluently. Next it's game time, as the class plays charades or taboo in order to reinforce the fluency vocabulary phrasingratepunctuation, and expression. Students then choose a text and read it independently, making notes to assist them when reading the text aloud. Finally, learners pair up and practice their fluent reading, providing each other with constructive feedback. Adaptable to a wide range of ages, this is a great resource for developing the reading skills of your class.
Third graders develop their reading superpowers in a activity on fluency. After first listening to an audio recording or teacher read aloud, the class works together identifying criteria for fluent reading, focusing on phrasing, rate, punctuation, and expression. Children then participate in a whole-class choral reading of a familiar text before pairing up for further practice with fluent reading. Though the activity is part of a third grade unit and cites specific texts, it can easily be adapted to other ages and pieces of literature. An excellent resource for developing this fundamental skill in young readers.

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