Reggae Teacher Resources

Find Reggae educational ideas and activities

Showing 21 - 40 of 87 resources
Learners share opinions about their favorite ethnic dishes. They research the cuisine of another culture and write a review of a local restaurant that features that cuisine.
This lesson focuses on how students can learn basic blues percussion patterns by considering the polyrhythms of African drumming and investigating how and why such drums were banned during slavery. Students will listen to several blues and non-blues recor
Middle schoolers go on an information gathering hunt on the Internet to study West African empires. They work in teams; meteorologists, bankers, writers, and archaeologists. They collect data on all sorts of topics related to West African cultures, and build a website to publish their findings. An ambitious, and educationally rich lesson.
Students explore how music reflects culture and how culture reflects popular music. After reading an article, they discuss how hip-hop has affected the lives of two young men of different races. They investigate the development and influences of various musical genres popular in the United States.
The first exercise in a series of worksheets, this handout asks learners to read 10 sets of sentences and choose the one with no errors in structure. Tip: Find all of the worksheets on parallel structure throughout our website and create a packet for your learners!
Ernie sings a reggae version of the Rubber Duck song in this video. This could be a fun activity to use as a filler. You could have students sing along.
In this West African geography worksheet, students read about the history, culture, and life in West Africa. Students take notes and answer 4 short answer comprehension questions as they read the selection.
Students study the folk music and dance of the island of Mauritius. In this music and dance lesson, students study the style of music and dance that is called sega. They learn about how the traditional music comes from the islands off the coast of Africa.
Students learn about Latin American dance and rhythm in different forms and participate in dancing. In this Latin American lesson plan, students also analyze Latin American paintings.
Fourth graders examine the experiences of four immigrant groups. In groups, they brainstorm a list of misconceptions of those groups and discuss if they are still present today. Using maps, they locate the countries of Puerto Rico, Dominican Republic, Jamaica and Cuba and research why they left their home country. To end the activity, they compare and contrast the music of the four countries.
Students explore the ways in which the worlds of popular music and opera can work together to complement the other. They work in small groups to analyze plot, characters, setting and themes of a popular opera using a summary of that opera as a guide.
Students study the state of the world before the slave trade. They explain the geography and economics of the slave trade. They explore primary sources and how historians use these sources to create historical interpretations.
Students research historical and cultural factors expressed in the Tejano musical form. They analyze lyrics and instrumentation critically to arrive at insights about the form.
Young scholars examine female artists who perform in the genres of rhythm & blues, jazz, soul, and hip-hop/rap. They compose lyrics and melody in one of these genres.
Students identify musical characteristics of blues music and define the term 'scale.' They identify chromatic, major, pentatonic, and blues scales and label each key on a keyboard using letter names, sharps and flats.
Students complete a unit of lessons on a variety of types of American music. They record their impressions of music samples on a worksheet, identify types of instruments, and choose a musical selection for their family to respond to.
Students examine the meaning of genre, and specifically investigate the musical genre of grunge. They view and discuss photos, watch the video, "VH1 Storytellers: Pearl Jam," answer discussion questions, and paraphrase the lyrics to a Pearl Jam song.
Students examine the different types of adversity African-Americans face. As a class, they role-play different roles in scenerios in which they discover the importance of facing their fears and taking responsibility for their actions. To end the lesson, they share their own dreams for their future and discuss how to accomplish them.
Fifth graders develop cultural awareness of their heritage, therefore building their self-esteem. They discover the link between learning and social skills and recognize that learning is an integral part of their lives. The recognize African folktales as a literary genre.
Students are able to demonstrate the ability to identify, contrast and compare the music of different places and regions, and the ability to recognize music as a resource for information about places and regions.

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