Relations with China Teacher Resources

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Students read an article about the relationship between China and North Korea. Individually, they write a paper about a previous experience they have had watching two people negotiate. They role-play the role of producers from National Geographic in which they must describe the border between the two countries and discover why their relationship is strained.
This unit focuses on the differences between North and South Korea as they are seen from an American point of view. Learners view the Frontline documentary, "North Korea Suspicious Minds," complete a series of handouts, read a variety of primary source documents, and engage in a class discussion. Handouts, web links, and discussion questions are highlights of this short unit.
In this English worksheet, students discuss North Korea. Students brainstorm, debate, and practice their listening skills with this worksheet.
Learners explore the concept of disarmament. For this North Korea lesson, students apply the steps of conflict resolution to the North Korean nuclear crisis as they create flowcharts designed to establish multilateral talks and resolve issues facing North Korea.
Students read an article about North Korea's alleged nuclear weapons program and planned negotiations of several countries. They discuss the article, do vocabulary exercises, correct hidden errors and complete a variety of comprehension activities.
Students read or listen to an article about North Korea's use of test missiles. They complete worksheets and discussions of the article as they focus on the new vocabulary.
In this English worksheet, learners read "North Korea to Test Long-Range Missile," and then respond to 1 essay, 47 fill in the blank, 7 short answer, 20 matching, and 8 true or false questions about the selection.
Students research a number of websites to see how North Korea's leaders have shaped the country. They investigate Korea's ancient history and culture.
Learners research and analyze the current political situation of North Korea. They read and discuss an article, conduct research, participate in a simulation of an international round table, and write a response essay.
Students study the cause of the Korean War. In this World history activity, Students read excerpts from two different textbooks, one from South Korea, and one from North Korea. They discuss how the cause of the war differs depending on the resource used.
Learners examine the current conditions in North Korea. They view and analyze a CNN documentary, research a dissident, answer and discuss questions about the documentary on conditions in North Korea, and identify the technology used by dissidents.
Students examine the United States' response to suspected nuclear proliferation in Iran and North Korea by participating in a fishbowl discussion and writing letters to President Bush.
Students examine the implications of North Korea's nuclear testing. They develop a K-W-L chart, read an article, write questions, conduct research on their self-generated questions, and create an exhibit of their findings.
Students examine population information from East Asian countries. Using a specified website, pupils explore the population of China, Japan, North Korea and South Korea. Classmates examine the population density compared to the world's total population. Students use the internet to complete a worksheet.
Students read an adapted article about North Korea's nuclear weapons program. They complete a variety of comprehension and extension activities including error correction, synonym match, brainstorming and debate.
Students examine the United States' response to the current concerns surrounding weapons of mass destruction in both Iraq and North Korea. They participate in a discussion to compare the differences. Then write an editorial.
Students examine the division of North and South Korea. They identify the ideological differences and the tensions between the two countries. They discuss the threat of nuclear weapons as well.
Ninth graders analyze the differences among various forms of government to determine how power is acquired and used. They need to have a strong background regarding the rise of totalitarian governments after The Great War and the reasons for Adolph Hitler's anger over the vindictiveness of the Treaty of Versailles.
Students participate in a lesson that focuses on the events of how Korea became a nuclear threat in the world. They use essential questions to help guide the research and come to right conclusions from the information.
Teens apply their knowledge of the five themes of geography and relate them to China's Silk Road. They investigate how the Silk Road ended China's isolation from the rest of the west. Note that some of the embedded links no longer work, so you will need to search for replacement websites to refer your class to. Also, the first page of the handout overlaps the teacher's guide, so you will want to recreate it more neatly.

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