Revolution Teacher Resources

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Tenth graders create a video tribute to students who lost their lives on May 4, 1970 at Kent State. The video must include photos with original narration in poem or song.
Casting the American Revolution into a bright, informative light, this presentation details many key facts about the strategies and decision during the revolutionary campaigns. The latter half of the slides prompt viewers to examine why the British lost the war, as well as covering the next steps for the blossoming United States of America.
High schoolers compare the Vietnamese Declaration of Independence and the US Declaration of Independence. In this Modern History lesson, students use primary sources to evaluate information on the development of free nations. This lesson includes multiple web resources, activities, and assessments.
When and how did the Cold War begin? To answer this question, you will not find a better-organized, in-depth, activity- and inquiry-based resource than this! Executing best teaching practices throughout, each portion of this inquiry involves detailed analysis of primary and secondary source material, supporting learners as they develop an answer to the resource's guiding question.
The phrase, "You sold out" has been thrown around among musicians that have lent their talents to the corporate world. Here, the class engages in an interesting discussion on how musicians make a living and the influence of commercialism and marketing in today's society. They then research how musicians lived in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries and come back to discuss how the music business has changed.
What do the members of your class already know about world history? This is a fabulous pre-assessment that will illustrate the varying levels of general world history knowledge among your young historians that you can use to inform your instruction accordingly. Questions involve a range of ideas, from correctly placing important persons and events within the appropriate time frame to listing religions of the world. Tip: Include some time for learners to list as many other world history facts or insights they can recall.
Here is a lesson that uses the painting Liberty Enlightening the World to start a discussion on the importance of national monuments. The class discusses several monuments around the world, and then invites a veteran to share his/her story. The also make sketches of the veteran. 
Students examine primary source documents regarding Martin Luther King and the Civil Rights Movement. They construct their own meaning and understanding of this time period and the way social justice issues are presented in primary source documents. They make connections to universal themes such as social justice, social transformation and reconciliation.
Students explore the concept of civilian cost to armed warfare. They explore the role of the military, civilians and of press coverage during armed conflicts, creating posters illustrating their research on post-WW II military conflicts.
Eighth graders explore the Cold War Era. In this world history lesson, 8th graders discover the positions taken by countries during the Cold War as they listen to lectures regarding the major events and turning points in the Cold War. Students also read selected text and listen to music regarding the era.
High schoolers reflect on the events that lead up to the Cuban Missile Crisis in the early 1960s.  In this history lesson plan, students explore the conflicts between the United States and the Soviet Union revolving around missiles in Cuba, then answer reflection questions about the topic.
Learners analyze the lyrics of protest songs as a catalyst for social change. They discuss the influence of music on behavior and explain the use of music as a means of self-expression.
Tenth graders research the historical background of a chosen country. They analyze the effects of Imperialism from a personal, historic, and modern-day perspective. They formulate a postion regarding the effects of Imperialism in their chosen country.
By learning about 1960's protest songs, and the politics of the era, students can broaden their understanding of music and history.
Tenth graders evaluate the role and consequences of civil disobedience compared to other forms of protest in the civil rights movement of the 1960s. They use Henry David Thoreau's essay, "Civil Disobedience," to delvelop their knowledge of the concept. Pupils define the term "civil disobedience" and give an example.
Learners examine the history of U.S. conflict and Memorial Day. They conduct research, develop a timeline of U.S. conflict, and create a shoebox Memorial Day parade to commemorate veterans and soldiers.
In this online interactive history worksheet, students respond to 8 short answer and essay questions about the Cold War. Students may check some of their answers on the interactive worksheet.
Students determine that history is a field of study that can help them understand themselves and the people around them. By reading sources by and about people with many of the same interests and concerns that they have and learning to see how these issues were dealt with differently at different historical times, they discover that history shapes people's lives and that people shape the changes in history.
Students research the War of Independence to examine how people's lives were affected by war. In this US history lesson, students work in groups to analyze object cards and define their use in a soldiers' encampment. Students select one of the people on the cards and write a letter home from their perspective.
Students examine and compare/contrast various harvest festivals from around the world. They read books, sing songs, and create various art projects about the harvest festivals from Ghana, China, Korea, Vietnam, and India.

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