Revolution Teacher Resources

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High schoolers discuss how a musician's message can influence society and government. They debate if political viewpoints should be publicized in music.
Young scholars examine photographs of memorials for veterans. They identify who is being honored and why. They research one hero they find interesting and create a memorial for them. They share their hero with the class.
Students examine photos of the Kent State University unrest of the 1970's and discuss what the photos represent. They complete a written assessment.
Students research five cities of their choice. They investigate the history, current economic standing, and two people who helped to influence the city in some way. They use the Internet to conduct their research.
Learners analyze the narrator's point of view as well as the historical perspective of songs and compare and contrast perspectives on changes in the American landscape identifying attitudes and reactions.
Learners examine different Supreme Court cases and discuss First Amendment rights.
Tenth graders work with a partner to locate and follow the directions of a webquest of their choice. Using the internet, they research their topic in depth and write a paper on their findings. They are assessed by the criteria on the rubric included with the lesson.
Track the ins and outs and wartime strategies used by both the British and the Americans during the Revolutionary War. Multiple comparisons are made between both factions, maps, statistical data, images, and light text is used throughout the presentation. This would be a good resource to accompany a full lecture and could span several class periods.
When, if ever, is the government justified in restricting individual rights? When, if ever, should the "greater good" trump individual rights? To prepare to discuss this hot-button topic, class members examine primary source documents, including Abraham Lincoln's Proclamation suspending the Writ of Habeas Corpus, Supreme Court decisions, and Executive Order 9066. After an extended controversial issue discussion of the questions, individuals present their own stance through an argumentative essay supported by evidence drawn from the documents.
What if society sought equality by handicapping the gifted and dispelling any traces of diversity? Kurt Vonnegut Jr. offers one possible answer to this question through his incredibly engaging and thought-provoking satirical story, "Harrison Bergeron". In addition to offering writing prompts and discussion questions that are sure to spark interest and debate amongst your readers, you will also have the opportunity to preview video excerpts where editors of the anthology engage in high-level discourse and work to elicit meaning from the classic American text.

New! Glory

If you are previewing the film Glory for your young historians, this packet may help you spark ideas for discussion and offer some interesting facts and quotations that may add to your presentation of this Civil War narrative. It includes a few worksheets that learners can use to track character development and major themes, as well as a fact sheet regarding black soldiers in the war and the 54th regiment. 
The United States of America was founded on firm ideals of both the pursuit of happiness and a spirit of reverence. Through a close reading of Nathaniel Hawthorne's "The May-Pole of Merry Mount," you can examine what some consider was a "culture war" between these two ideals in the early stages of the new nation. After giving a brief overview of the story, work with your readers through the text using the guided questions provided by this resource. 
May 4, 1970. The Kent State shootings, also known as the May 4 Massacre, rocked the nation. Ohio National Guardsmen, called to the Kent State campus by Governor James Rhodes, fired on unarmed college students, killing four and wounding nine others. Rather than examining whether or not the National Guard should have fired on the crowd, class members consider whether the guard should have been called to the city of Kent at all. After conducting an in-depth analysis of a series of primary and secondary source documents, groups assume the identity of a student or Mayor LeRoy Satrom and provide reasons for why the Guard should or should not be called in. The class then watches the documentary, The Kent State Shootings: Dealing With Dissent and reflect on whether or not they regret the decision they made and why.
Designed for an advanced placement class, this resource requires class members to assess President Kennedy's dedication to civil rights through reading, discussion, and writing. Provided with a set of eight primary and secondary sources, pupils must read and examine individually before working in small groups to prepare an argument and debate. After the debate, one hour is allotted for a timed writing and self-assessment. All necessary materials are included except a rubric.
Art and music have been vehicles for statements of civil unrest for hundreds of years. Upper graders critically analyze several pop songs or music movements from the 1980s that exemplify politically charged motives. They analyze lyrics that were written purposefully as protest, and lyrics whose meanings changed as they were used by specific groups or for a specific reason. They engage in a class discussion and write a short paper on a single song.
Young scholars connect the symbols from the design of the United States Mint Fifty State Quarters Program to our country's history in this five-lesson unit. The culture, unique heritage, and geography of the individual states are probed.
How did Ku Klux Klan develop and flourish in the US? How did the government respond to acts of terrorism conducted by the KKK following the Civil War? How does the government respond to acts of terrorism today? This resource launches a study of terrorism and government response. Richly detailed, the plan includes links, photographs, and worksheets. A powerful resource.
Students explore the cities of Cairo, Istanbul, Jerusalem, Mecca and Tehran.  In this Middle East lesson plan, students complete a map, research one of the five the cities and prepare a presentation that includes details about the city.  Students also create a musical instrument that these five cities are known for.
Young scholars research the roles of the reserve armed forces in a variety of United States military conflicts, then create a documentary that illustrates the contributions of part-time soldiers.
Students consider the insight to the past that oral histories can provide. They, in groups, analyze oral histories, prepare to interview a family member on their recollections of a historical event and then write a historical narrative.

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