Richard Nixon Teacher Resources

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Ninth graders examine the reasons for the fall of communism in the Soviet Union and the rise of communism in China. They listen to a lecture and complete slot notes, listen to and read the lyrics to the song "We Didn't Start the Fire" by Billy Joel, and discuss the meaning of the song.
Twelfth graders determine how to change history. In this American history lesson plan, 12th graders research events in American history and analyze how they may have had outcomes that changed the course of history. Students examine the Civil War, immigration policies, and the Cuban Missile Crisis.
In this online interactive history quiz worksheet, students respond to 46 multiple choice questions about the Cold War. Students may submit their answers to be scored.
Though slightly dated (around the 2008 Presidential election), the information and discussion points in this presentation about political humor are solid. Use the slides in your language arts class in a lecture about semantics, or in a political science class about language in the media. A list of references and resource links could help to guide your lecture as well.
Students take and defend positions on what conditions contribute to the establishment and maintenance of a constitutional government. They debate whether or not the government should have prosecuted Nixon over the Watergate scandal.
Learners watch tapes of televised presidential debates dating from 1960. They analyze debates and participate in mock debates.
Students study the Beatles and the contributions their music made to much of the pop music that came afterward. They synthesize complex information and the skills of "compare and contrast" in writing. They research some aspect of the Beatles' musical heritage.
Third graders study American national holidays, symbols, songs and landmarks. They appreciate the meaning and significance of our nation's ideals of liberty, justice and equality.
Students analyze the process of Reconstruction after the Civil War.  In this U.S. History instructional activity, students discuss specific details about Reconstruction with the class, then complete a worksheet with multiple activities reinforcing the ideas they shared.
Young scholars research the six key aspects of Chinese culture. They examine problems and issues from different perspectives and look in to the nature of international relations in an interdependent world. All of this is accomplished by completing a WebQuest on China.
Learners examine the history or successful entrepreneurial ventures such as Federal Express. In groups, they research various entrepreneurs and uncover their common characteristics. Then, students apply these themes to create their own companies and write business plans for them.
Learners examine the roles of each of the branches of U.S. government. In this checks and balances lesson plan, students watch Discovery video segments and discuss the concept of federalism as they create a school-wide policy for government which affords specific powers to individual classrooms.
High schoolers research and analyze Lyndon B. Johnson's achievements as the 36th President focusing on his legislative program. They consider how the passage of time can influence a President's reputation.
Learners analyze the impact of a global economy on the workers, business leaders and governments of China and the United States.
Students use a variety of reference materials to complete a trivia-question scavenger hunt assignment. They seek answers to questions in many curriculum areas.
Young scholars find an image depicting events of September 11 or after and write a letter to their future grandchldren explaining the image and why those chose to preserve it for them.
Students analyze writings of Mr. Martin Luther King Jr. They read and discuss an article, and in pairs, research and analyze a written work or speech by Dr. King, create a mixed media collage to represent the text, and write an artist statement.
Young scholars share their own thoughts about the United States' involvement in Iraq. They read an article about what the Democrats would do if they were in charge. They develop a poll for members of their community to take and analyze the results. They draft a letter to a candidate who is running for office.
Young scholars compare the histories of Japan and the United States by creating horizontal time lines of the two countries. They conduct research via the internet and available text books to complete their time line. The class discusses the similarities and differences of the two cultures.
Examine the results of recent opinion polls on where people stand on the issue of the death penalty. In groups, middle schoolers examine various cases dealing with this issue and discuss the judgments. They write their own argument for or against the death penalty and participate in a debate to end the lesson.

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