Rise of Nationalism Teacher Resources

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Using primary source documents, young historians explore the strategies the US used to defeat Japan during WWII. They also learn about the American military experience, and innovations that changed the style of warfare. Students benefit from  a graphic organizer, lecture, group work, discussion, and writing. Ultimately, individuals must write an essay that incorporates primary source information.
Propaganda is an important topic that most high school social studies teachers address. Here, students compare and contrast methods of public persuasion during WWII with those used in the contemporary War on Terror. Research, discussion, and critical thinking questions provide the foundation for learning. It includes a list of key terms and a link to Hitler's Mein Kampf; however, the Powerpoint referenced in the resource is not provided. There are no rubrics or assessments included. While the description indicates that this will take one class period, more time may allow for greater understanding.
Students identify the author's purpose. They identify different perspectives from a variety of historical situations. Students complete individual projects to their interest. They discuss WWII and the Holocaust. Students examine current events and report in writing.
WWII led to a collapse in colonial empires Europe had created prior to the turn of the century. Budding historians examine the fall of Imperialism through expository writing. They compose three responses that discuss the role of the Indian caste system, European imperialism, and its collapse after WWII.
If your really want your history class to know everything about old and new imperialism, look no further. This 58-slide presentation depicts, describes, and explains everything from 19th Century expansion and the Congress of Berlin to the Russo-Japanese War and the Boxer Rebellion. A five-star resource ready to make your next unit on Imperialism great.
Eleventh graders examine the effects of the bombing of Pearl Harbor in 1941. In this US History activity, 11th graders analyze primary source photographs in order to understand the daily life of the Japanese in the camps.  Students explore the legality of these internment camps based on the Constitution.
High schoolers select a World War II leader: Hitler, Mussolini, Stalin, or Franco and create a visual representation of their "power" explaining how they gained control of their nations. Then write a poem or rap that expresses the experiences or feelings of persons who lived through the Battle of Britain.
Students examine the Journalist perspective. In this WWII lesson, students act as journalists and create a "Commemorative Historical Magazine" based on events leading up to the United States role in WWII. Students will design their magazine and its cover, write articles for the magazine, create a political cartoon, and analyze the design and mission of WWII propaganda posters.
Sixth graders read Under the Blood Red Sun (UBRS), V is for Victory (V), and Number the Stars(NS). They examine WWII through the eyes of Japanese, Danish, and American students and complete at least two projects: a radio broadcast and a powerpoint.
Young scholars explain how the Civil War and Reconstruction both solved and created problems for our nation. They study how Reconstruction caused a further decline in relations between the North & South and how racism has been and is existent in the U.S. from slavery through the present.
Learners consider the differences between totalitarianism and democracy. In this comparative politics instructional activity, students will read a handout describing the major components that comprise totalitarianism and democracy, then they will apply what they have learned to Hitler's choices during WWII. Learners will engage in a class discussion, research, and fill in a Venn diagram.  
A lot happened to European economics, policy, and social systems after WWII. This 24 page social studies packet provides images, reading passages, comprehension questions, and critical thinking questions regarding all things Europe from  1945-1980. Extensive, complete, and well worth your time. 
Students read and analyze newspaper accounts of Holocaust-related items in various WWII newspapers. They discuss the physical placement of Holocaust-related news items to other news items in the same paper.
You have just entered the Cold War Zone, with 96 slides at your disposal. From changes in government in China, The Marshall Plan, and the Iron Curtain, to the Vietnam War and Ronald Regan, this presentation will help you cover it all. A highly comprehensive, clear, and well-organized resource, a wonderful addition to any unit on world politics after WWII.
What a great resource to share! Based on the book Lost Names by Richard Kim, this valuable lesson focuses on the Japanese occupation of Korea during WWII. Additionally, it employs first-person journaling as a mode of understanding themes in the book. Class discussion of concepts and vocabulary, solid reading strategies, and a historical perspective make this a really nice lesson.
Students discuss the significance of the atomic bomb. In this WWII lesson, students write down what they know about the dropping of the atomic bomb in WWII and read two historical narratives of the event. Students divide into two groups: Japanese experience experts and American experience experts and read documents to support their side and then present their evidence.
Students examine the advancements made in aviation during and since WWII. They read an interview with Charles McGee, research a plane, build a model of a plane, and develop a Powerpoint presentation about aircraft.
After reading personal accounts and watching the video entitled, European Theater during WWII, learners write a letter. They use what they know about the Battle of the Bulge, WWII warfare, and the time period to compose a letter home in the voice of a soldier on either the American or German side of the war.
Students visit two sites about World War II. These sites show how war can impact a nation and how people have coped with life during years of war. Particular attention is paid to how the media covers the current war in Iraq.
Students identify the civil rights abuses suffered by African Americans, Japanesse Americans during WWII, and Hispanic Americans. They explain what the common element is among the discrimination against these three groups. Students are explaine that a table is an excellent tool for comparisons.

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Rise of Nationalism