RMS Lusitania Teacher Resources

Find Rms Lusitania educational ideas and activities

Showing 1 - 20 of 60 resources
High schoolers, after brainstorming all the different types of propaganda, explore, analyze and study the nature, origin and purpose of propaganda and how its aims are achieved. They assess how the sinking of the Lusitania was manipulated by the British government and media.
Young scholars explore the pride of the Cunard line and a jewel in the British crown; a floating four star hotel. But during World War I, the RMS Lusitania carried more than well-to-do travelers luxuriating in her sumptuous appointments.
Students research the sinking of the Lusitania. They work together to develop a position supporting an idea. They discover principles of international law and the rights of non-combatants in wartime.
Sixth graders examine issues that faced Americans during World War I, discuss role that sinking of the Lusitania had in America's decision to enter the war, and analyze changing role of U.S. during the war and how it emerged as a world power.
Seventh graders continue their examination of World War I. In groups, they read a copy of the famous Zimmerman telegram and discuss its effect on Americans. To end the lesson, they discuss how public opinion changed after it became public and how Texans reacted.
Students explore shipwrecks. In this forensic lesson plan, students watch a video about a shipwreck and how scientist use forensics to answer questions about the ship. They research and report about a shipwreck from the teacher's approved list.
Students explore the reasons the United States became involved in World War I.  For this World History lesson, students research the reasons Woodrow Wilson made the decisions he did, prepare a debate and write a paper.
In this World War I worksheet, students read a 5 page selection about the war and then respond to 5 main idea and critical thinking questions based on the selection.
Students identify an editorial and propaganda, discuss differences between weekly and daily newspapers, analyze needs of rural and urban newspaper audiences, and evaluate possible power of the press and importance of multiple views concerning events.
In this world history worksheet, students create their own chart and poster showing some major events of World War I by following the steps outlined on these 3 pages.
Sixth graders discuss the issues that America was dealing with during World War I. They describe the outrage felt by Americans when they knew they could no longer remain neutral. They examine how the war made America a world power.
As part of a review of the causes of WWI, this activity could come in handy as a supplemental activity. Students could complete the twenty-one question worksheet, and use the terms for further discussion.
What do you know about WWI? The creator of this fantastic presentation sure knows a lot! From the beginning of the war, to the trenches and the home front, World War I is discussed in full. Each slide includes images, blocks of informational text, and embedded hyperlinks. A really great tool to help learners understand many aspects of the war to end all wars.
A great way to prepare learners for that annual state exam is with a review session. You can use all or only some of these questions to quiz kids on various aspects of colonial America, the Columbian Exchange, and the Revolutionary War. There are 51 questions total, some with answers and some without.
Students identify several important events that led to U.S. involvement in World War I. They examine different explanations, form an opinion about the evidence for each rationale and then create a slideshow to present their findings.
Exploring WWI in an interesting discussion of the key events, this resource could be as a great supplement to a classroom unit on this topic. The pictures and information make this period in history come alive. Students would also benefit from reading first-hand accounts of trench warfare, or the subsequent peace agreement, to get a better idea of how this war led to WWII.
Use this twelve-day lesson plan to teach about the causes and courses of WWI. Each day scholars attend lectures, complete creative activities, and hold round table discussions on what they've learned. Web links and resources are included. Note: some days do not have a full lesson plan but state the topic to be covered. Lesson Planet has many presentations available that could make this lesson a reality.
For this online interactive history quiz worksheet, students respond to 50 multiple choice questions about the accomplishments of Woodrow Wilson. Students may submit their answers to be scored.
Middle schoolers and high schoolers examine the ethics of using human test subjects in scientific research. They do a simulation which focuses on yellow fever and how human subjects were used to develop a treatment/cure for the disease after the Spanish American War.
Eleventh graders reconsider the events leading to U.S. entry into World War I through the lens of archival documents.

Browse by Subject


RMS Lusitania