Rock and Roll Teacher Resources

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How did technology influence rock music? A thorough presentation outlines the history of rock, beginning with the technological advances that made it possible. It discusses Country, Blues, Hillbilly, and Early Rock music in terms of how one influenced the other, social impact, and progression. 
Upper graders explore the similarities, differences, and depth of pop music from the Romantic era and the 20th century. They listen to selections that exemplify the Baroque, Romantic, and 20th century periods, then create presentations that represent one of the three music periods. An extensive link list to various music videos and audio clips is available.
Students listen to the lyrics of modern songs by Arrested Development, Lauryn Hill, and others to enhance their study and to connect to characters, conflicts, and themes of the play, A Raisin in the Sun.
This lesson examines both the content and form of lyrics in blues songs. In addition to highlighting the basic musical form of a blues song, it also addresses the use of floating verses in blues music, both within the context of the original era in which
Middle schoolers go on an information gathering hunt on the Internet to study West African empires. They work in teams; meteorologists, bankers, writers, and archaeologists. They collect data on all sorts of topics related to West African cultures, and build a website to publish their findings. An ambitious, and educationally rich lesson.
Working in small teams, students analyze a variety of primary source materials related to lynching (news articles, letters written to or written by prominent Americans, pamphlets, broadsides, etc.) in order to assess the effectiveness of the anti-lynching campaign spearheaded by African-Americans. The information each team culls from the documents is then placed on a large class timeline.
Pupils analyze a variety of primary source materials related to lynching (news articles, letters written to or written by prominent Americans, pamphlets, broadsides, etc.) in order to assess the effectiveness of the anti-lynching campaign spearheaded by African-Americans. This resource focuses on Billie Holiday's signature song, "Strange Fruit," a protest song Lewis Allen (Abel Meeropol) wrote in 1938 about the ongoing and intransigent problem of lynching in the American South.
Students listen to the song :King of Pain" by the Police. They identify different instrumentation and different rhythmic accompaniments to the opening vocal phrase and explore the text in-depth, discussing the various poetic images of pain. Then, using the local newspaper, they discuss the variety of ways pain is expressed by people affected by tragedy. In a creative writing assignment, they rewrite a factual news article to express the emotions of a person afflicted.
Get your class primed for a comparative analysis lesson with this activity. They compare and contrast their music preferences to those of their classmates. After reading an article, they identify current trends in popular music, analyze the importance of music in their lives and interview others to determine their favorite type of music.
Students are introduced to a groups of African American inventors. In groups, they research the role of each person in improving different industries. They also examine the barriers African Americans faced from the Civil War to the Civil Rights movement. To end the lesson, they share their information with the class.
While delving into the book WJHC On the Air!, students can use this packet to guide discussions. This nine-page packet has a problem/solution chart, and a variety of questions relating to each section of the book.
Discover a wealth of activities for teachers, pupils, and administrators to savor during Teacher Appreciation Week.
Students describe some of the distinguishing characteristics of rock, folk, blues, and country music. They identify two main musical roots of today's American popular music.
We're going way back to the 1950s, 1960s, and 1970s to discuss pop culture, entertainment, and social dance. Kids discuss the top headlines from those time periods and how music, culture, and dance influence each other and evolve over time. They then predict how social dance will evolve in the future. 
Upper graders listen to the blues. They discuss blues scale, read a description of the blues, and work together to write an original piece. A lesson like this ties into American history and African-American musical contributions very well. It also promotes self-expression and creative problem solving. 
An engaging and fun lesson on telling time is here for you. In it, young time-tellers listen to the song, "Rock Around the Clock," then use Judy Clocks to practice telling time to the hour and half hour. Finally, using paper plates, each pupil makes his own clock using fasteners and markers.
Eight various activities have your learners looking at hype in the media. Advertisements for films, politics, music, and philanthropy all contribute to emotional appeals and marketing strategies trying to convince consumers to participate. Ask the questions listed here to start your class thinking about advertising techniques and their effects. Help your class develop critical awareness of the world around them.
In this energy worksheet, students read about potential energy and kinetic energy. Then students complete 16 matching, 8 fill in the blank, and 9 word problems.
For this kinetic and potential energy worksheet, high schoolers read about energy of position and energy of motion and are given the equations to find each. Students match 11 terms with their definitions about both types of energy and the components of the equations of kinetic and potential energy. They identify energy as potential or kinetic and they calculate the potential and kinetic energy in 9 problems.
Eleventh graders are introduced to the events between the years 1949 and 1989. They list and explain key events and people that contributed to the development of the Cold War. Students are asked "what do you think Billy Joel meant by 'We didn't start the fire', and why do you think this has historical relevance, or does it?"

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