Salvador, Brazil Teacher Resources

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Eleventh graders undertake media research on an issue and prepare a series of questions. They divide into the government and the opposition and select two issues for discussion. They discuss Question Period tactics, and then undertake a session.
Students read a story called Scientists Discover Oldest Mayan Mural and answer vocabulary and comprehension questions about it. In this current events Mayan mural lesson plan, students respond to literature by answering questions, recalling details, sharing facts, researching locations of maps, investigating symbols/hieroglyphics associated with the ancient Mayan language, and explore history on various websites.
Young scholars express their views on censorship and read Orwell's essay about Dali. They examine other controversial pop culture figures and write about them.
Sixth graders explore how their food choices can have an impact on the rain forests. They examine coffee farming and how their techniques can harm birds in the rain forest. Students design two farms with sustainability of bird habits in mind and present them to the Rainforest Alliance.
Welcome to the Spanish-speaking world! Show your learners which countries declare Spanish as their primary language. Included are maps and flags for each Hispanophone country.
According to the presentation, the age of confusion was marked by a very specific set of art and philosophical movements. Take a visual trip, and explore expressionism, cubism, Dada, Bauhaus, existentialism, and the new modes of understanding that defined early 20th Century art.
Using Mark Twain's The Man That Corrupted Hadleyburg, invite your learners to consider the concept of virtue in a democratic society devoted to gain and self-interest. This stellar resource guides your class members through a close reading and discussion, and also includes a video seminar illustrating what high-level discourse regarding the text looks like.
What are the strengths and weaknesses of American individualism and independence? Explore these principles through a close reading of Jack London's To Build a Fire, and engage in high-level discussion with your class by analyzing the characters, story structure, and themes of the text.
In this episode of Crash Course World History, John Green does an excellent job summarizing the reasons behind the ideological clash between the United States and the Soviet Union in the Cold War. Covering early features of the war such as the Marshall Plan and the policy of containment, Green goes on to explore US efforts around the globe to stop the spread of communism, and the lasting implications of those endeavors. Tip: Consider pausing at 2:00 to discuss the magnitude of Green's statement.
Learners discover the Age of Exploration by comparing and contrasting the explorations of Zheng He, Christopher Columbus, and Vasco da Gama in this engaging history episode. The narrator discusses who may be considered the greatest mariner of the fifteenth century, as well offers the opportunity for your class members to clearly analyze the objectives and accomplishments of three noteworthy explorers.
Explore the food chains that support Arctic ecosystems. A class discussion on interdependence and the different roles plants and animals play in ecosystems provides students with the knowledge to complete a worksheet asking them to create food chains involving a variety of Arctic life. To further engage students in the lesson, consider assigning each child an Arctic plant or animal and having the class arrange and rearrange themselves into food chains. This resource would fit perfectly into a unit investigating the different types of ecosystems found around the world.
From days of 24 hour sunlight, to endless nights that last for days, the Arctic is a very unique place to live. Examine the seasonal changes that occur in the northern-most reaches of the globe and the impact they have on the plants and animals living there. The included worksheet offers a number of different opportunities for learners to demonstrate their understanding of this unique region. This instructional activity would fit nicely in either a unit on ecosystems or weather and climate in an upper-elementary science class.
What if society sought equality by handicapping the gifted and dispelling any traces of diversity? Kurt Vonnegut Jr. offers one possible answer to this question through his incredibly engaging and thought-provoking satirical story, "Harrison Bergeron". In addition to offering writing prompts and discussion questions that are sure to spark interest and debate amongst your readers, you will also have the opportunity to preview video excerpts where editors of the anthology engage in high-level discourse and work to elicit meaning from the classic American text.
The United States of America was founded on firm ideals of both the pursuit of happiness and a spirit of reverence. Through a close reading of Nathaniel Hawthorne's "The May-Pole of Merry Mount," you can examine what some consider was a "culture war" between these two ideals in the early stages of the new nation. After giving a brief overview of the story, work with your readers through the text using the guided questions provided by this resource. 
Explore the digital stacks of the New York Public Library. Made up of over 700 primary and secondary sources, the app opens a door directly into the past. Users will be fascinated by this archive, which documents the World of Tomorrow.
Delve into the Age of Exploration with this activity-packed resource! Complete with a pre-test, discussion questions and quiz for a 30-minute video on the period, map activities, timeline of discoveries, vocabulary, etc. this is a goldmine for ideas and activities associated with exploration in the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries.
Combining a close reading of a classic American text with the study of history can be a very powerful strategy, and this is most certainly the case with this resource using Edward Everett Hale's The Man without a Country. Consider themes as citizenship and national identity using the engaging discussion questions and prompts in this resource, and use the included videos to present an example of high-level discourse.
Within these guidelines for a comparative government project, you'll find some very useful worksheets that support learners in breaking down demographic, economic, and political information regarding each of their chosen countries and respective governments. 
Learn about life in the Arctic while practicing how to graph and interpret data with this interdisciplinary lesson. Starting with a whole group data-gathering exercise, students are then given a worksheet on which they analyze and create bar and pie graphs involving information about Arctic animals. This lesson is perfect for tying together a math unit on representing data and a science exploration of Arctic ecosystems. 
Investigate the properties of three-dimensional figures with this Arctic-themed math instructional activity. Beginning with a class discussion about different types of solid figures present in the classroom, young mathematicians are then given a two-sided worksheet asking them to draw 3-D shapes, identify their parts, and create cubes from a series of nets. Though the instructional activity does not provide any detailed information about the Arctic, it is does provide a fun change of pace to a geometry unit in the upper-elementary grades.

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