Pupils examine the steps for developing science fair projects. They visit stations where they examine posters, books, and paper that describe how to research and design a science fair project. Additionally, they take notes on how to develop a project.
This extensive earth science practice test is composed of 50 multiple choice questions and 31 short answer questions. The questions cover weather, the water cycle, geology, the solar system, and more. Many of the short answer questions refer to pages in the answer booklet. This answer booklet is provided in additional materials. Answers to the multiple choice questions are not included, but there is answer sheet for those questions. Earth Science Reference Tables are not included.&lt
This comprehensive earth science practice test is composed of 50 multiple choice questions and 32 short answer questions. The questions cover weather, the water cycle, geology, the solar system, and more. Many of the short answer questions refer to pages in the answer booklet. This answer booklet is provided in additional materials. Answers to the multiple choice questions are not included, but there is answer sheet for those questions. Earth Science Reference Tables are not included
Students conduct an experiment. In this physical science lesson, students learn about Isaac Newton's theory that for every action there is an equal but opposite reaction. Students show this theory by looking at how a rocket is propelled through outer space.
Sixth graders discover heat is conducted in a variety of ways. In this physical science lesson, 6th graders investigate various conductors of heat, they explain their findings, and discover how energy is exchanged between objects through radiation. To conclude the lesson, students write predictions in their science notebooks to questions prompted by the teacher.
Students investigate the six properties of yeast. For this inquiry science lesson plan, students experiment with yeast by testing its interactions with other materials and making observations. 
Why can speaking in public be so horrifying and have such strong effects on our bodies? Discover the science of stage fright! Your young learners will learn about the connection between stage fright and our natural fight or flight response, how humans are wired to worry about reputation (which public speaking can threaten), and how using perspective and practice, you can work with your vertebrae hypothalamus to adapt to stage fright.
Here is a very important demonstration on why it's so important to wear helmets when doing any kind of high speed activity. A third grader's science fair project tested four different types of helmet: football, ski, skateboard, and bicycle. Each helmet had a honeydew melon in it. The helmets were dropped off a twenty-foot-high balcony onto concrete. The bicycle helmet was the only helmet that left the melon unharmed.
Chemical attraction? Yes! High schoolers will be fascinated by the science behind the romantic feelings. They may be surprised that the eyes act first, drawing us to take a closer look, and the nose acts next, sensing major histocompatability complex molecules. The ears also play a role, and of course, so does touch! This far-out feature can be added to a biology lesson on the senses or reproduction, or it can be included in a psychology unit.
Students share their science expertise with elementary students in a conference format. Elementary students rotate through sessions of different science disciplines (Biology, Earth Science, Physics, Chemistry, Computers).
Fifth graders use science process and thinking skills. They communicate effectively using science language and reasoning.
Young scholars study science concepts as they are presented in poetic form. They write and present their own science poems to parents during Open House.
Pupils prepare and care for a classroom science corner. For this science lesson, students contritubute items to the classroom science corner, and invite other classes of pupils into their room to share their scientific items.
Pupils search for examples of social science in and around their school. They create a Social Science scrapbook of the eight social sciences, that includes news articles and summaries that focus on each social science area.
Students reinforce science concepts learned throughout the year using Movie Maker. Eighth grade students work with fourth grade students in which they create a movie project about a science topic after completing a graphic organizer.
Students develop an understanding of the different fields of study that are encompassed by the term, life science. They view and discuss a video on the topic. In small groups they focus on on of the examples shown in the video to create a decorated poster.
Learners explore the world of detective science. In this detective science instructional activity, students learn about identification through lip prints, teeth prints, and handwriting. Learners participate in several activities to create their own teeth impressions and lip prints.
Students explore ethics. In this science ethics instructional activity, students examine science lab classroom ethics as they consider various scenarios that encourage authentic student discussion and the formulation of guidelines and principles.
Students set up science journals. In this science lesson plan, students read selected science-related newspaper and magazine articles. Students follow a rubric that lays out the written form requirements for responses to the current events science articles.
Third through fifth graders prepare posters to present at a science fair. Working with a partner, pupils conduct investigations and  prepare a poster to present their findings. They rehearse their presentations, and add visual aids; charts and graphs that enhance their material.