Seminole Teacher Resources

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Showing 1 - 20 of 153 resources
Students research the issues and relationships between 2 refugee groups--the Seminole and African slaves. They analyze primary documents and discuss the effects of racism in the 21st century.
Young scholars explore the Southeast Woodland region and culture of the Seminole Indians using video, art projects, books, maps and discussion.
Fifth graders describe the reasons for, nature of, and outcomes of the Second Seminole War. They determine that Seminole women and men faced many hardships as they fought for their survival. They relate a story of a Seminole "first" to the notion that people from historically oppressed groups must often struggle to accomplish their goals in society.
Students discuss the roles of the 8 Seminole clans: Wind, Panther, Bird, Snake, Bear, Big Town, Deer and Otter. They discuss the matriarchal nature of the Seminole sociey. They interview family members and then create an illustrated story of their individual clans.
Students examine the human side of history as revealed through personal interviews, newspaper articles, and fictional accounts. They record the history of various sites and people in the Seminole area and prepare manuscripts.
Students interview Seminole patchwork makers to find out about the history behind patchwork, how patchwork is made, and the meanings of various Seminole patchwork. Then they create some patchwork of their own.
Students listen to a story about the Seminole Indian tribes. They participate in a teacher-lead discussion of chickees--Seminole housing. They create a chickee book in which they write a description of their belongings in a chickee.
Students investigate the Seminole Wars, their events, and treaties. They create a timeline, label a map of Florida showing the Seminole population and do research about life on an Indian reservation.
Students read about and discuss the history of chickees, traditional Seminole houses. They discuss the importance of chickees in Seminole history and create a model of chickee out of palmetto fronds and syprus branches.
Students participate in teacher-lead discussion of Seminole patchwork and styles of dress. They practice identifying the patchwork design of the Seminoles and what they mean. They create (and write a description of) a paper doll self-portrait using various patchwork designs.
Students participate in demonstrations from guest speakers, community members and teacher-lead discussions, tell differences and similarities between contemporary and traditional styles of Seminole clothing, explain the different designs that symbolize meanings on Seminole clothing and take pictures of classmates in traditional Seminole clothing.
Students will identify and label Seminole foods in Miccosukee (native language) and English. They construct a chart on traditional Seminole foods and prepare a traditional Seminole meal.
Students identify 5 types of Seminole foods, illustrating the types of food on paper plates, bowls, and cups. Students explain their favorite foods and identify plants and animals that are part of the Seminole diet.
Learners listen as a guest speaker describes the process of gathering and preparing materials for making a Seminole basket. They use provided materials to create their own basket and finally, they give an oral presentation on their basket.
A wonderful activity on dwellings of Native Americans awaits your learners. In this reading comprehension and American history activity, students answer questions about the dwellings, create pictures of them, and complete a matching activity. Excellent!
Eighth graders examine the cultures of Black Seminoles Indians and Gullah. For this cultures lesson students create a presentation based on how these social groups influenced each other and how slavery helped define them.
For this online interactive history quiz worksheet, students respond to 49 multiple choice questions about the accomplishments of Andrew Jackson. Students may submit their answers to be scored.
Students create a Native American Nation flip book. In this Native American lesson plan, students choose one of four Native American Nations: The Iroquois, Hopi, Seminoles, Sioux. They research them on the Internet using teacher given websites and create a flip book describing what they learned. 
Fifth graders use maps of Florida. They locate places from a list on their map. Students use the places mentioned in the book, "To Walk the Sky Path," and locate them on the map. Students should have labeled a minimum of 10 places, and included a legend, a compass rose, and distance scale.
Students read Dancing With the Indians by Angela Shelf Medearis. They complete a variety of cross-curricular activities surrounding the study of Native American festivals and traditions. Included are reading, art, math, science, writing, social studies, and library connections.

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