Special Education Teacher Resources

Find Special Education educational ideas and activities

Showing 41 - 60 of 4,055 resources
Parents and children work together in a community circle to discuss caring for people with special needs. In separate groups, the children sing and listen to a story. They discuss ways people are alike, and ways they are different. Parents take on a physical limitation, and explore the site to determine accessibility.
Students consider a fictional situation in which literacy could spell the difference between life and death. They apply their knowledge of how reading empowers people by creating a literacy program that addresses the special needs of a specific community.
A good idea. To build both speech and social skills special ed students go on a scavenger hunt. They locate people around the school and say a series of words, when they say the words correctly they receive a prize. They also ask for things, which they will receive if they ask appropriately. 
Create a graphic organizer to review parts and systems of the body, then present a new topic. Special education students grades 3-5 learn about the sense of hearing. They draw parts of the ear, sign a song, read Perk Up Your Ears, and sort loud and quiet things. Could be used with any age as long as its developmentally appropriate.
Second graders read different folk tales and discuss them. They are given a template of a letter and they are to write a friendly letter. Special education students are paired with advanced students to help them.
Students explore self-esteem and create a self-portrait collage. They discuss things they like about themselves, things they are able to do on their own, and reasons people appreciate them. They demonstrate how to give and receive compliments.
Students review gender identification and label themselves female or male. They identify the parts of the human body and practice using appropriate vocabulary. They complete a worksheet to complete the lesson plan.
Learners create "Shamrock Men" using construction paper, pre-cut patterns, glue, and scissors in this lesson that celebrates St. Patrick's Day. The lesson was originally create for a Special Education class but could be adapted for younger general education classes.
Young scholars in a special education class work to improve their endurance. As a class, they complete the same exercises at the beginning of each class trying to increase the number of reps. They are also introduced to healthy eating habits and discuss the importance of eating certain items in moderation.
Students read and discuss the history of special education in public schools related to the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act. Students work in groups to design ways to modify classroom activities based on the needs of a student with a specific disability. Students present their ideas for modifying activities and assignments to the class.
Teenagers explain the process from making the decision to have a baby to parenthood. They identify the positive and negative aspects of parenting. In small groups, they browse catalogs of baby equipment and evaluate the cost of supporting a new baby. Enough extension activities are suggested to make this a week-long topic within your life skills or health curriculum.
Sixth graders in a special education class discuss excerpts of two stories and read biographical information on the authors. In groups, they read the full text of both stories and try to solve the mystery as they read. They practice their skills working with others and write in their journals to reflect on the lesson plan.
Create a digital movie documenting research about an American President. Using internet sources, students with special needs gather information about their chosen president. Working in groups, they use this information to create a digital movie giving a biographical account of the president's life.
Students in a special education class identify the setting in various photographs. Using the photo, they share what they believe is going on and what the characters are doing. They use the internet to choose pictures from a historical website that have a setting.
Students are read examples of literature that reinforces the concept of tolerance. Using the story, they identify the letters and discuss the equipment needed by those persons with special needs. They compare and contrast their likes and differences and discover how tolerance makes responsible citizens.
Parents might find that teaching special needs children at home can be incredibly beneficial.
Students examine the characteristics of HIV and AIDS. They identify the liquids in which the disease is found and how it can be transmitted. They examine healthy behaviors to keep them from getting the disease.
Students, in special education and inclusion classes, practice writing skills by sharing notes with the teacher and each other. Using instruction sheets, they substitute words and rewrite the selection in a way they understand. In individual instruction sessions, students develop vocabulary comprehension skills and practice writing for clarity.
Students define helpers, acquaintances, and strangers. They label the characters on a worksheet using the appropriate term and show the proper behaviors to exhibit when approached by a stranger.
The "Big Book Project" provides special-needs learners with the opportunity to develop, write, and publish "Big Books" for Kindergarten-Grade 3 classrooms. Students also go to classrooms and read the book they wrote to the younger students.