Speciation Teacher Resources

Find Speciation educational ideas and activities

Showing 41 - 60 of 132 resources
Students explore how gene sequence analysis can be used to examine phylogenetic similarities of different organisms. Students work in groups to simulate a gel electrophoresis separation of fragments using poster board to create their gel.
In this adaptations worksheet, students read about 3 species that have changed over time to adapt to their environment. Students design a squirrel that has adapted to an island habitat that students are assigned. They describe the squirrel's adaptations and why they are beneficial. Students are given 14 terms for which they must give an example of one species that fits the term.
In this biology worksheet, students complete 132 multiple choice and short answer questions on various biology related concepts.
Investigate the coral reefs around Mokolai Island, Hawaii by researching and writing about improving the reef ecosystem.  Students map threats to the ecosystem and use the list of key words to assist in their descriptions
A video about the impact of climate change on butterfly populations and a PowerPoint about butterfly and bird adaptations warm science learners up for the activity to follow. Using a variety of tools that reprsent unique styles of bird beaks, scientists simulate the collection of food. The types of food collected successfully are logged and combined with results from other lab groups. They repeat the activity with a new set of food that represents what is available after a drought. In this way, they consider the impact of climate change.
Students explore the different types of vertebrates found in their area. In this environmental science activity, students perform a case study on the Common Raven. They analyze data collected from research and create charts and graphs.
Students experience, through a "dig," the historical discovery of fossils which increasingly link whales to earlier land-dwelling mammals. They encounter the intermediate forms which show changes that lead to the modern whale.
Students attempt to pick up various objects with a wide variety of beaks, including scissors, spoons, etc.
Students apply Team Games Tournaments, a cooperative studying strategy developed at Johns Hopkins University. They utilize the games as an assessment alternative and/or as a review technique.
Students review the unit on evolution and natural selection by playing a card game. Students take turns drawing a card from the stack and reading the question out aloud. The reader gives an answer. The other students, in turn may pass or challenge an answer. The correct answer earns the student a point.
A colorful wedge of Earth, map of tectonic plates, and numbered facts about Earth structure fill the first two pages of this resource. After reading and absorbing the information, geologists get into groups and make clay models to demonstrate faulting and folding of Earth's crust. A second activity is also included in which individuals research Pangaea, Laurasia, and Gondwana. Plenty of background information and a grading rubric are included to support you with these assignments.
Explore the concept of evolution and cell biology; your class can work in groups to use the internet to view websites on evolution, take a quiz, and complete a lab activity.
Students discuss Darwin's theory of evolution. In this biology lesson, students investigate what influenced Darwin's thinking as it relates to Evolution. They discuss pros and cons of Natural Selection.
Students label maps with the geographical distribution of wolf subspecies and the original locations of dog breeds. They read and discuss related articles and write essays based on their research.
Students design a presentation that trace the development of an organ system through the major phyla of the animal kingdom looking for the relationships between structure and function by documenting adaptations.
High schoolers examine mechanisms behind biological evolution and the theories that feed it, and are able to demonstrate their knowledge of these theories in a story.
Students investigate the evidence and consequences of global warming. They read and discuss an article, conduct a debate, evaluate their community's climate statistics, log their gas consumption for a week, and develop a panel discussion on fossil fuels.
Young scholars examine the value of ecosystems. They read and analyze an article, evaluate ecosystem services, research the benefits of biomonitors, and design a public service announcement.
Learners examine the topic of evolution as it relates to biodiversity in various remote areas of the world. They watch videos, conduct Internet research, and in small groups create a digital video report to illustrate common evolution in their own world.
Ancient coral beds give scientists clues to past ocean temperatures in much the same way that tree rings indicate historical weather conditions. High school scientists examine coral oxygen isotope ratios and plot the data as a function of the age of the coral. They relate their findings to climate change. Many resource links are included that can lead to extension activities. 

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