States and Territories of The United States Teacher Resources

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Fourth graders describe how the French and Indian War resulted in expansion of United States Territory and analyze information from two or more sources for agreements, contradictions, facts, and opinions.
Students study the United States flag. In this American history and government lesson, students define and give examples of familiar symbols.  Students design a classroom flag.  Students identify and describe the American flag.
Pupils examine the role of commerce in the United States to help fulfill Manifest Destiny. They write commercials that could have been used by the Mexicans or Americans during the Mexican War.
Students engage in the study of the United States flag while accessing research using a variety of resources. The information is used in order to create a class project that focuses upon the meaning of freedom and The United State Flag Code.
Students investigate the history of the United States flag. In this civics lesson, students read handouts regarding the flag and its history. Students also read and discuss the Federal Flag Code.
Students explore how empires around the globe have impacted the world in which they have existed. They analyze whether or not the United States is an imperialist nation and create their own empires based on their understanding of empires in history.
May 4, 1970. The Kent State shootings, also known as the May 4 Massacre, rocked the nation. Ohio National Guardsmen, called to the Kent State campus by Governor James Rhodes, fired on unarmed college students, killing four and wounding nine others. Rather than examining whether or not the National Guard should have fired on the crowd, class members consider whether the guard should have been called to the city of Kent at all. After conducting an in-depth analysis of a series of primary and secondary source documents, groups assume the identity of a student or Mayor LeRoy Satrom and provide reasons for why the Guard should or should not be called in. The class then watches the documentary, The Kent State Shootings: Dealing With Dissent and reflect on whether or not they regret the decision they made and why.
Are states prohibited or permitted by the wording of the Constitution to leave the Union? After analyzing the decisions of selected Supreme Court cases and other primary source documents, spark discussion and debate with your class on this fascinating topic.
Students examine how the European voyages of discovery influence American culture even today. They map eighteenth century Europe's impact on the United States.
Students examine the differences between various state constitutions in the United States. Then, using their own
Several wars and changes in government had to happen before Europe was able to consolidate its state system. The presentation begins with King Louis XV and runs through each major European ruler over the next 72 years! It provides political and biographical information on Anne I, George I and II, Charles VI, Maria Theresa, the succession of Fredericks, and Peter the Great. 
Third graders explore U.S. geography by researching the history of Michigan. In this Michigan constitution lesson, 3rd graders identify the Northwest Ordinance and read a story from their textbook Michigan History for Kids. Students conduct a census in their class in which they determine whether Michigan is a legitimate State or merely a territory.
Students learn basic facts about the Supreme Court by examining the United States Constitution and one of the landmark cases decided by that court.
Students explore basic map skills. In this United States geography lesson, students define "country" and "state," locate their state on a United States map, and identify and trace state boundaries defining their state and surrounding areas.  
Students explore the development of the Nation-States after they broke off from the Soviet Empire.  For this Geography and World History lesson, students participate in a class discussion that is centered around teacher lecture.
Eighth graders explore how to use the time zones in the United States and internationally. They use elapsed time to solve problems. Students calculate the time in various places in the United States. They discuss the 6 time zones in the United States.
Examine the different perspectives on the future of United States Navy bombing exercises taking place on Vieques, Puerto Rico with this lesson from The New York Times. Here, young learners read "Islanders to Vote on Vieques Bomb Drills," an article about the islanders vote on the issue. Then they draft letters to President Bush that support their own views on the issue. Consider including a second text with a different viewpoint.
Students examine the Battle of Little Bighorn and its impact on United States and Native American culture through reading current and historic New York Times articles and by creating a research-based exhibit about this historic event.
Young scholars share experiences of places they have visited or would like to visit. They create travel guides for trips to take in the United States based on themes from their studies, incorporating both historical and current data about those destinations.
Students consider how they, their pets, and their parents define and defend their personal spaces or territory. They discuss the reasons that countries sometimes fight over territories. Students conclude by drawing pictures of themselves, their pets, their parents, and their country's territories and by writing sentences describing scenarios in which territories are threatened.

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States and Territories of The United States