Thinking and Reasoning Teacher Resources

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Students examine both sides of arguments surrounding given debates. They use the internet and other research to collect information to support their stand on the controversial issue. Students debate their chosen topic. This lesson plans lists 31 different debate topics which include, but are not limited to, war, vegetarians, income tax, military, cloning, global warming, space travel, suicide and more.
Students develop critical thinking skills while exploring new ideas about success, discuss people they consider to be successful, and identify how they measure or define their own personal success.
Expose your class to Shakespearean language with a manageable excerpt from As You Like It. A wonderfully comprehensive plan, this resource requires pupils to use higher-level thinking skills to interact with a complex text and connect literary devices to thematic meaning. Middle schoolers will examine diction, imagery, sound devices, figurative language, and more through the six provided activities.
Students examine the relationships between reading, writing, and thinking skills in completing math problems.
An art history detective; I want to be one of those! The class puts their heads together to hone their deductive and critical thinking skills in order to determine which Native American tribe created and used parfleche boxes. They'll use maps, research, and discussion to complete this fun and engaging task.
In this thinking skills instructional activity, students read three clues to figure out which of three pictures of geometric shapes is the correct one. Students draw an X on each shape that doesn't fit the clues. Students circle the correct shape. This page would need to be duplicated in color.
In this thinking skills worksheet, students read 3 clues to determine which fruit (from four choices) is the correct one. Students draw an X on each fruit that does not fit the clues and circle the correct fruit. The clues refer to the color of the fruit, so this page would need to be duplicated in color.
In this thinking skills activity, students read a description about the kind of pet a girl wants. From three choices, students circle the picture of the pet that best fits the description.
In this thinking skills worksheet, students read a paragraph that describes the travel needs of a man who needs to get to a building on top of a mountain. From 3 picture choices, students circle the vehicle that is the right one to fit the situation.
In this thinking skills worksheet, learners draw a line connecting each blue figure without touching any other color. Students connect 4 figures.
For this thinking skills worksheet, students read the clues to determine which vehicle is matches the clue. Kids draw an X on each vehicle that doesn't match the clues. Students circle the correct vehicle.
In this thinking skills worksheet, learners read 3 clues to determine which number (from four choices) is the correct one. Students draw an X on each number that does not fit the clues and circle the correct number. Note: The directions tell learners to choose the correct shape, but these are numbers.
Help your students internalize knowledge by creating activities that utilize higher level thinking skills.
Discuss your class' vision of the future. Learners create materials for use in a time capsule. They write letters to explain their contribution and provide photos.  Afterwards, they use higher-level thinking skills to reflect on why they wrote what they did, and share their findings.
Experiment with electric circuits and conductivity. Young scientists will model and discuss how an electric circuit works. First they will draw a model of the flow of electrons and then build an actual circuit. Finally, they will explain the circuit path and test the conductivity of a variety of materials. They use critical thinking skills to explore circuits and conductivity of materials. Be sure to check the materials list before planning for this activity.
Long term book projects can help engage students and enhance their critical thinking skills .
Turn your 6th graders into detectives while growing their love of reading. Using critical thinking skills, they will be able to describe the five basic elements of detective fiction, read detective novels, make predictions, use the scientific method, and write their own detective story. This engaging activity includes all plans and questions.
Creating learning centers with artifact-related activities are a great way to promote deductive reasoning and critical thinking skills.
By learning how to identify and understand social commentary students can flex their critical thinking skills.
Students complete a variety of daily enrichment puzzles designed to encourage critical thinking skills, while developing and reinforcing math and language arts skills.