Thomas "Stonewall" Jackson Teacher Resources

Find Thomas "Stonewall" Jackson educational ideas and activities

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This resource was made to review a study guide created by this teacher. He covers a lot of basic information relating to the Civil War, so consider making your own study guide to go along with this resource. He is engaging and appeals to high school learners in particular. A good overall review.
Having questions to focus on during a class lecture can help learners know what topics to hone in on. Here are 61 short answer questions, intended to accompany a lecture on the Civil War. They can use the packet as a study guide, for note taking, or to guide them during lecture.
In this Civil War worksheet, students define key terms and identify key people. Thirty-two terms and names are given, as well as answers.
Pictures of the major players in the American Confederacy make up this presentation - and not much else. No information (beyond names) is given about these men and women, leaving the responsibility to the lecturer. Possibly useful in the context of a larger Civil War unit, these images are unable to sustain the presentation as a whole.
Now here is a very good presentation on the American Civil War, that you shouldn't pass up. Rich in text and images, the presentation covers all the bases. All of the major battles, key people, policies, and even a section describing the role women and African-Americans played during the war are discussed.
Students explore the Civil War and the many emotions that emerged during this era. The teacher arranges students in groups of families and prepares them to simulate typical responses during this era. The Civil War and Gettysburg is re-enacted. Students write letters to their "family" members describing historical events in which they are involved. They pantomime a battle scene.
Students examine uses for water. In this water instructional activity, students discuss how they use water. As a class students make a PowerPoint by naming one swimming safety rule. Students compare and contrast fishing for fun and fishing for survival.
Turn your middle schoolers into Biographical Scene Investigators in an investigative reporting lesson! They identify heroic individuals selected from the provided list and keep their own evidence notebooks regarding the actions of their subject. Next, they research print and Internet sources for evidence of the subject's heroic actions.
In this online interactive Civil War worksheet, students respond to 14 multiple choice questions about the Battle of Antietam. Students may check their answers immediately.
In this online interactive Civil War activity, students respond to 10 multiple choice questions about endangered Civil War battlegrounds. Students may check their answers immediately.
In this online interactive history quiz learning exercise, students respond to 50 multiple choice questions about Abraham Lincoln. Students may submit their answers to be scored.
Students are be able to analyze primary sources (Civil War images) for examples of how soldiers are portrayed historically. They discuss what a hero is and why some individuals are heroes to certain groups while others are not.
Fifth graders reflect on what slavery might have been like. In this U. S. history lesson, 5th graders, participate in a class discussion about slavery, then create a timeline of what a slave's life might have looked like.
Students share historical facts during the morning news program. In this past events lesson, students look at the current date and find things that happened on that day in history. Students discuss if those events changed or shaped the world as we know it now.  
Fourth graders investigate Patrick Henry. In this primary source lesson students view primary sources of Patrick Henry. They discuss who he was and why he is famous.
In this online interactive Civil War worksheet, students respond to 15 multiple choice questions about the Battle of Fredricksburg. Students may check their answers immediately.
For this online interactive reading comprehension worksheet, students respond to 25 multiple choice questions about Stephen Crane's The Red Badge  of CourageStudents may submit their answers to be scored.
In this online interactive reading comprehension worksheet, students respond to 25 multiple choice questions about Irene Hunt's Across Five AprilsStudents may submit their answers to be scored.
Fourth graders investigate the Civil War by researching the state of Virginia.  In this US History lesson, 4th graders identify Abraham Lincoln, James Chestnut and Fort Sumter, and discuss their roles in the start of the Civil War.  Students examine maps and photographs on the Internet in order to complete worksheets and take a quiz.
Students use the internet to gather information on the Civil War. They create a timeline of events and write a newspaper article about one of them. They research an important figure of the war and write a biography.

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Thomas "Stonewall" Jackson