Thomas "Stonewall" Jackson Teacher Resources

Find Thomas "Stonewall" Jackson educational ideas and activities

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Now here is a very good presentation on the American Civil War, that you shouldn't pass up. Rich in text and images, the presentation covers all the bases. All of the major battles, key people, policies, and even a section describing the role women and African-Americans played during the war are discussed.
Students examine uses for water. In this water lesson, students discuss how they use water. As a class students make a PowerPoint by naming one swimming safety rule. Students compare and contrast fishing for fun and fishing for survival.
Students explore the Civil War and the many emotions that emerged during this era. The teacher arranges students in groups of families and prepares them to simulate typical responses during this era. The Civil War and Gettysburg is re-enacted. Students write letters to their "family" members describing historical events in which they are involved. They pantomime a battle scene.
Turn your middle schoolers into Biographical Scene Investigators in an investigative reporting lesson plan! They identify heroic individuals selected from the provided list and keep their own evidence notebooks regarding the actions of their subject. Next, they research print and Internet sources for evidence of the subject's heroic actions.
In this online interactive Civil War worksheet, students respond to 14 multiple choice questions about the Battle of Antietam. Students may check their answers immediately.
In this online interactive Civil War worksheet, students respond to 10 multiple choice questions about endangered Civil War battlegrounds. Students may check their answers immediately.
In this online interactive history quiz worksheet, learners respond to 50 multiple choice questions about Abraham Lincoln. Students may submit their answers to be scored.
Young scholars are be able to analyze primary sources (Civil War images) for examples of how soldiers are portrayed historically. They discuss what a hero is and why some individuals are heroes to certain groups while others are not.
Fifth graders reflect on what slavery might have been like. In this U. S. history lesson, 5th graders, participate in a class discussion about slavery, then create a timeline of what a slave's life might have looked like.
Students share historical facts during the morning news program. In this past events lesson, students look at the current date and find things that happened on that day in history. Students discuss if those events changed or shaped the world as we know it now.  
Fourth graders investigate Patrick Henry. In this primary source lesson students view primary sources of Patrick Henry. They discuss who he was and why he is famous.
In this online interactive Civil War worksheet, students respond to 15 multiple choice questions about the Battle of Fredricksburg. Students may check their answers immediately.
In this online interactive Civil War worksheet, students respond to 10 multiple choice questions about Robert E. Lee. Students may check their answers immediately.
For this online interactive reading comprehension worksheet, learners respond to 25 multiple choice questions about Stephen Crane's The Red Badge  of CourageStudents may submit their answers to be scored.
In this online interactive reading comprehension worksheet, students respond to 25 multiple choice questions about Irene Hunt's Across Five AprilsStudents may submit their answers to be scored.
Fourth graders investigate the Civil War by researching the state of Virginia.  For this US History lesson, 4th graders identify Abraham Lincoln, James Chestnut and Fort Sumter, and discuss their roles in the start of the Civil War.  Students examine maps and photographs on the Internet in order to complete worksheets and take a quiz.
Pupils use the internet to gather information on the Civil War. They create a timeline of events and write a newspaper article about one of them. They research an important figure of the war and write a biography.
Sixth graders become members of the BSI in this research simulation. They apply for Biographical Scene Investigator membership, investigate an individual, keep an evidence notebook and write an investigator's report.
Students research the Civil War and the Battle of Gettysburg. In this Gettysburg lesson plan, students analyze journals and letters written by the Gettysburg soldiers. Students define Civil War soldier vocabulary words. Students compare and contrast the two drafts of the Gettysburg Address, learn about the leaders of the war in a power point, rewrite 3 paragraphs of the Gettysburg Address, and complete a creative project.
Students examine how John Brown's 1857 trial related to conflicting viewpoints on slavery, view perspectives of radical abolitionists, moderate abolitionists, and slave owners, and form their own opinions on issue of slavery.

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Thomas "Stonewall" Jackson