Townshend Acts Teacher Resources

Find Townshend Acts educational ideas and activities

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Students examine the events leading up to and after the Townshend Acts in Boston. In this American History lesson plan, students engage in a class discussion and write an essay about the failure of the British Stamp Act and the Colonial reaction to the Townshend Act of 1965.
Eleventh graders study the American Revolution. In this American History lesson, 11th graders analyze primary sources. Students participate in a simulation on taxes. 
Rather than simply summarizing the events that led to the American Revolution, have your learners listen as John Green offers some interesting points to be used as discussion or writing prompts in your review of the war. Green details early American colonies as self-governing entities, brings to light some hypocrisies of the War for Independence, and concludes by discussing the influence of the Enlightenment.
Your young historians will have the opportunity to design a six-page brochure on the American Revolution with specific guidelines for what to include in each section. Activities for each page range from creating an acrostic poem using the word revolution, to defining vocabulary words and writing a mini-biography for a significant person from the war.
In this online interactive history quiz worksheet, learners respond to 50 multiple choice questions about Samuel Adams. Students may submit their answers to be scored.
Fifth graders investigate the causes of the American Revolution. They explore how political, religious, and economic ideas and interests brought about the Revolution (e.g., the Stamp Act, the Townshend Acts, taxes on tea, coercive Acts). After all the investigations are discussed, the students prepare for a debate on the causes of the American Revolution.
In this online interactive history worksheet, students respond to 19 matching questions regarding the events that led to the American Revolution. Students may check their answers immediately.
Fourth graders explore personal freedoms by analyzing U.S history. In this colonial era lesson, 4th graders identify the Colonial era and identify the 3 types of colonists that inhabited the U.S. at that time. Students define the Sugar Act, Stamp Act and Townshend acts before viewing a video in class.
Eighth graders identify and explain the sources of conflict which led to the American Revolution. They select one of the causes of the Revolutionary War and then write an editorial about the cause.
Beginning with the experience of hearing that lockers in school will be taxed, through analysis of political cartoons and informational text, and culminating in a debate between loyalists and patriots, your class members will engage in a comprehensive review of the causes of the American Revolution.
This resource is rich with primary and secondary source material regarding major events in the Atlantic world during the Age of Revolution. While there are suggested classroom activities toward the beginning of the resource, its true value lies in the reproductions of such major historical documents as the United States Declaration of Independence, the Haitian Declaration of Independence, and the United Nations Universal Declaration of Human Rights. Use the sentence frames in the Classroom Guide as a solid framework for considering the theme of freedom and what it means to different individuals as you review the instructional materials.
This simple project can have great implications for your learners' understanding of the shifts in power during the American Revolution. Using an included worksheet, your young historians will design a timeline of the revolution and identify five events they believe were most significant to the changes in power. 
The importance of considering multiple perspectives of the same event is the big idea in this exercise that focuses on the Boston Massacre. Class groups examine photos of four depictions of the massacre, an English and an American newspaper account, trial testimony, a clip from an HBO film, and then read their textbook account of the event. Using information gained from these documents, individuals write a letter to the editor of either a British or an American newspaper and assign blame  for the event.
Here is a wonderful presentation, perfect for setting the stage for the Revolutionary War. Containing great information and images, it acts as a timeline of events starting with the French Indian War and ending with the dawn of the American Revolution. The plan of union, Stamp Act, Boston Tea Party, Tea Act, Boston Massacre, and George Washington are described in rich detail.
Fifth graders view primary documents to become familiar with the causes of the American Revolutionary War.  For this Causes of the American Revolution lesson, 5th graders answer questions based on the documents. Students complete a graphic organizer projected on an overhead projector.
Fifth graders describe the changes in King George III's policy toward the American colonies by sequencing key events between the French and Indian War and the American Revolution. They explain the colonial reactions to command decisions made by King George III and the British Parliament by describing events related to the Stamp Act and the Tea Act.
Students examine the causes of dissatisfaction that led to the American Revolution. Then they make a Flap Vocabulary Book and glue on a map of the thirteen colonies and make a title page called "Road to War in it." Students also identify and interpret the Proclamation Act of 1763, the Sugar Act 1764, the Stamp Act 1765, and what the colonial mindset what during this period.
In this online interactive history quiz worksheet, learners respond to 50 multiple choice questions about the American Revolution. Students may submit their answers to be scored.
Eighth graders investigate the role of South Carolina in the American Revolution. In this colonial American lesson plan, 8th graders analyze primary documents and images to determine how the state was involved in the outbreak of the war and how they felt about the war. Students also listen to a lecture and write essays on the topic.
Sixth graders investigate the causes of the American Revolution.  In this causes of the American Revolution lesson, 6th graders make hypotheses, analyze data, and rank the top causes of the war. Students complete a timeline and write a paragraph on the most important cause.