Trinomials Teacher Resources

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In this completing the square worksheet, 8th graders solve 10 different problems that include completing a square. First, they complete the square in the first 8 problems and write their solutions. Then, students determine what values to place in each box to create a perfect square trinomial.
Students factor polynomials representing the difference of squares, perfect square trinomials, and the sum and difference of two cubes. They identify and factor binomials that are the differences of squares when given examples.
In this Algebra II worksheet, 11th graders factor quadratic expressions.  The two page worksheet contains explanation of topic, worked examples, and three practice problems.  Answers are not included. 
In this factoring trinomials worksheet, students solve 5 multiple choice problems. Kids factor trinomials using the box method or by separating the trinomial into the product of two binomials. Students find the volume of a box by factoring a cubic with a GCF.
In this online math worksheet, learners solve five algebra problems which require them to factor trinomials. This excellent worksheet allows student to check their answers and gives the students "hints" should they encounter difficulties.
Students factor trinomials correctly. In this algebra lesson plan, students review the rules for factoring trinomials. They factor different polynomials as they relate the same concept and idea to facoring trinomials.
In this algebra worksheet, young scholars factor trinomials into the multiplication of two binomials. All trinomials are in the form 1x^2 +/- bx +/- c.
In this trinomials worksheet, 9th graders solve 10 different problems that include factoring various types of trinomials. First, they set up a product of two parentheses where each will hold two terms. Then, students determine the factors that go in the first positions. In addition, they determine which factors go into the last positions and solve.
In this factoring trinomials worksheet, students select the type of trinomial problem they wish to work on and click the interactive link. Each type of problem has thirty drills and practice problems linked to it. The problems themselves are not interactive.
In this factoring worksheet, students factor quadratic trinomials. This one page worksheet contains twenty-eight multi-step problems.
In this Algebra I worksheet, 9th graders factor trinomials with a leading coefficient of one.  The one page interactive worksheet contains five multiple choice questions, a hint for each question, and is self checking.
For this Algebra I worksheet, 9th graders factor trinomials in the form ax2  + bx + c.  The one page interactive worksheet contains five multiple choice questions and is self-checking.
For this Algebra I worksheet, 9th graders factor the difference of two perfect squares and perfect square trinomials.  The one page interactive worksheet contains five multiple choice questions and is self checking.
In this Algebra I activity, 9th graders factor by pulling out the greatest common factor and factor trinomials in the form ax2 + bx + c.  The one page interactive activity contains ten multiple choice questions and is self checking.
In this algebra learning exercise, high schoolers factor trinomials whose leading coefficient is greater than one. There are five multiple choice questions.
The rational expression in this example is of a trinomial divided by a trinomial. Learn how to simplify this rational expression. The instructor demonstrates how to factor each trinomial and cancel the like terms to get it in simplest form.
Completing the square is an effective way to solve a quadratic equation. Introduce your class to this technique and use this video to complement your lesson. This resource takes viewers through the process of completing the square, solving the quadratic equation , and checking answers, explaining each step along the way. A great resource.
Learn how a trinomial is divided by a binomial in this long division problem. The instructor does a good job explaining all the steps necessary to solve this problem.
FOIL it! What? You want to multiply two binomials then use the FOIL method: First, Outside, Inside, Last. When you have done that, your final steps is to combine the like terms.
A polynomial is the sum of one or more monomials. They are identified by the number of terms they have. Monomials, binomials, trinomials, find out what these terms identify.

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Trinomials