Uzbekistan Teacher Resources

Find Uzbekistan educational ideas and activities

Showing 1 - 20 of 65 resources
Students are introduced to the technique of suzani. Using a map, they locate Uzbekistan and trace some people's heritage back to Genghis Khan. Individually, they decorate their own replica suzani on recycled paper and present them to the class.
Learners examine the purpose of education.  In this schooling lesson, students read a letter from a child in Uzbekistan. Learners compare and contrast their schooling to children around the world.
Students examine an author's philosophical look at life through anecdotes he describes as a teacher in Uzbekistan. In this Uzbekistan lesson, students analyze a literary passage in order to identify, then practice using, similes, allegory, and other types of symbolism in writing. Studetns describe the climate and cultural aspects of life in Uzbekistan.
Students discuss what they know about the regions where snow leopards live. They observe the worksheets to see if they can identify any of the mountain ranges and then use atlases to check and complete the country identification worksheet.
Students become more environmentally conscious. They see that it may be too late to "save" the Aral Sea, but there is still hope to prevent the ecological collapse of the Salton Sea.

New Review Arctic Food Chain

Explore the food chains that support Arctic ecosystems. A class discussion on interdependence and the different roles plants and animals play in ecosystems provides students with the knowledge to complete a worksheet asking them to create food chains involving a variety of Arctic life. To further engage students in the lesson, consider assigning each child an Arctic plant or animal and having the class arrange and rearrange themselves into food chains. This resource would fit perfectly into a unit investigating the different types of ecosystems found around the world.
From days of 24 hour sunlight, to endless nights that last for days, the Arctic is a very unique place to live. Examine the seasonal changes that occur in the northern-most reaches of the globe and the impact they have on the plants and animals living there. The included worksheet offers a number of different opportunities for learners to demonstrate their understanding of this unique region. This lesson plan would fit nicely in either a unit on ecosystems or weather and climate in an upper-elementary science class.
Within these guidelines for a comparative government project, you'll find some very useful worksheets that support learners in breaking down demographic, economic, and political information regarding each of their chosen countries and respective governments. 

New Review Take 6

Investigate the various properties of the number six with this elementary math lesson. From simple addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division problems to the creation of hexagonal tessellations, this lesson covers all aspects of this simple number. As a lesson, this would best fit in a geometry unit introducing hexagons, but the included worksheet could also stand alone as an option for early finishers.
Learn about life in the Arctic while practicing how to graph and interpret data with this interdisciplinary lesson. Starting with a whole group data-gathering exercise, students are then given a worksheet on which they analyze and create bar and pie graphs involving information about Arctic animals. This lesson is perfect for tying together a math unit on representing data and a science exploration of Arctic ecosystems. 

New Review Shapes

Investigate the properties of three-dimensional figures with this Arctic-themed math lesson. Beginning with a class discussion about different types of solid figures present in the classroom, young mathematicians are then given a two-sided worksheet asking them to draw 3-D shapes, identify their parts, and create cubes from a series of nets. Though the lesson does not provide any detailed information about the Arctic, it is does provide a fun change of pace to a geometry unit in the upper-elementary grades.
Students use different types of maps to examine the region of Asia. They examine how the region of Central Asia is defined. They develop their own scavenger hunt based on maps to complete the lesson.
Students address their questions, anxieties and other feelings about the changes in American society since the terrorist attacks on the United States on September 11, 2001 and the subsequent reactions around the world.
Young scholars consider the concept of 'human rights' in relation to the current conditions and history of East Timor and discuss the terms "human rights" and "force," applying their responses to specific historical examples.
Learners construct a model of the hydrologic cycle, and observe that water is an element of a cycle in the natural environment. They explain how the hydrologic cycle works and why it is important, and compare the hydrologic cycle to other cycles found in nature. This is one of the most thoroughly thought-through, one-period lesson plans I've ever come across!
Students explain the crisis in Sudan and are offered background and current information (as of August 2004) about the situation there. The lesson covers the current conflict between the people of Darfur and the Janjaweed militia.
Learners identify different types of marketplaces found in Asia. They discuss how the environment influences the production and sale of goods in the area. They also examine the topics of scarcity and economic value.
Students consider indicators that mark a country's progress, examine how last year's State of the Union address has affected U.S. foreign policy, research issues deemed important in that speech, and create report cards assessing the country's progress.
Students examine the relationship between the United States and the Soviet Union during the Cold War. They analyze the role of religion and cultural identity in shaping governments. They also examine the United States foreign policy.
Students make estimates on how many people they believe live on Earth. While watching a video, they take notes on the issues facing Kenya, Japan and India. In groups, they calculate how long it takes for a country to double in size. To end the lesson plan, they discuss the challenges countries face with increasing populations.