Vietnam Teacher Resources

Find Vietnam educational ideas and activities

Showing 1 - 20 of 544 resources
A highly engaging warm-up activity kicks off this plan for teaching class members about the Vietnam War. After the anticipatory activity, the teacher chooses the means by which to provide an overview of the war (PowerPoint, lecture, textbook, etc.). Next, 11th graders answer a series of questions to ensure a fundamental understanding. Lastly, individuals receive a timeline strip with a particular event that they research. On paper, they create a description/depiction of the event and place it in chronological order with the other posters. All of the necessary resources are included.
Students share what they know about the Vietnam War before examining how the war was viewed and by people who lived during that period. They write essays expressing opinions on why it is still difficult for Americans to discuss the war.
"It was my view then, and still is, that you don't make war without knowing why." Remembering Vietnam is a powerful resource. The essential questions, the activities, the readings, the materials examined all seek to provide learners with the information Tim O'Brien refers to in The Things they Carried. The objective stance permits individuals to formulate their own opinions about the Vietnam War and the Vietnam Memorial. A must-have for an English Language Arts or Social Studies curriculum library.
Students explore Vietnam War from Afrocentric perspective, examine experiences of black people both at home and in war zone, and write three to five page response to quote by W.E.B. DuBois regarding race relations and Vietnam War.
Students consider why South Koreans fought in the Vietnam War. In this Vietnam War lesson, students engage in an activity through which they investigate why South Koreans fought in the Vietnam War and how their participation in the war was viewed.
No need to look any further. This resource has everything for a solid exploration of the role of African Americans in the Vietnam War. Class members read primary sources, including a Martin Luther King speech, political cartoons of the era, as well as a comic book. All of the discussion questions are included as are the materials. In the end, 11th graders create an informational flyer for King's April 4th, 1967 speech. It includes a synthesis of information they learned throughout.
Students comprehend how the United States became involved in what one historian called the quagmire. Students identify and analyze the importance of the Tet Offensive in turning American public opinion against the Vietnam War. Students identify how the Vietnam War is still a vital part of American life and culture. Students encourage active learning by holding an in-class debate between pro- and anti-war views.
Students, in groups, listen carefully to the song(s) and to complete worksheet.
Students explore protest songs. In this interdisciplinary lesson, students examine issues-based music by summarizing lyrics and revealing inferences, generalizations, conclusions, and points of view found in the songs.
Foster discussion in your advanced high school history class with primary sources from the Vietnam War era. After a timeline activity involving manipulatives, pupils get down to business analyzing and categorizing the document set. All of this work is in preparation for a fish bowl discussion and timed essay.
Students examine the impact of the Vietnam War. In this Vietnam War lesson plan, students discuss the music, the video images, and the culture of the war. Students create a classroom timeline that features major events in the war and write about how the war impacted the United States.
Students explore the Vietnam War in music. In this Vietnam lesson, students listen to and analyze popular music from the Vietnam era in order to understand the use of propaganda regarding the controversial war. Students develop questions for interviews with grown-ups who remember the war.
Students discover how the United States became involved in the Vietnam War, the importance of the Tet Offensive in turning American public opinion against the war, and how the Vietnam War is still a part of American life and culture.
Eleventh graders examine the year 1968 in Vietnam and the United States. They work together to research events which they create a timeline. They also read primary source documents of veterans of the Vietnam War.
Students examine the arguments for and against the United States involvement in the Vietnam War. In groups, they must assign the Vietnam War a just or unjust war using the techniques used to fight and the reasons used by the government to declare war. They present their ideas to the class making sure to support their arguments. To end the activity, they develop viable alternates to war.
Students create new words to convey their thoughts. They find, list and discuss the poetic devices used by the poet in creating his or her war poem and create their own war poems. They use sensory perception words and memory in creating a poem.
Students create Venn diagrams comparing and contrasting the Vietnam and Iraq wars. They write informed letters to their senators expressing their opinions and possible solutions to the war. They also create mock bumper stickers displaying their views about the war in Iraq as either Democrats or Republicans.
Students participate in variety of learning activities about the 30th anniversary of the end of the Vietnam War.
Students investigate the 30th anniversary of the end of the Vietnam War. They work with words in order to explain the events of war.
Students research Muhammad Ali's act of civil disobedience. For this civil disobedience lesson, students research Ali's defiance of the Vietnam War draft and compare his reasoning to Martin Luther King's thoughts on the war. Students debate nonviolent action and write a response to Ali's violent/nonviolent nature in his life and draft resistance.