Vietnam Communism Teacher Resources

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The history, context, and ramifications of the Vietnam War are the topics of this lecture, which details the roles of China, England, France, and the U.S. in the conflict. A timeline and map guide viewers through the events of the Vietnam War. They will be enthralled by the growing tension between North and South Vietnam, and the increasing political and military presence of the U.S. It also details the My Lai Massacre, which could prompt a class discussion on the ethics of battle.
Students consider why South Koreans fought in the Vietnam War. In this Vietnam War lesson plan, students engage in an activity through which they investigate why South Koreans fought in the Vietnam War and how their participation in the war was viewed.
Discuss the full travesty of the Vietnam War. Whether it's for history class, Memorial Day, or Veterans Day, this slide show is sure to make an impact on learners in the upper grades. Vivid images, concise language, and the complete causes, effects, and events which occurred throughout the entire war are defined here, including the actions of each president who held office during war time.
Students research Muhammad Ali's act of civil disobedience. In this civil disobedience lesson, students research Ali's defiance of the Vietnam War draft and compare his reasoning to Martin Luther King's thoughts on the war. Students debate nonviolent action and write a response to Ali's violent/nonviolent nature in his life and draft resistance.
In this Vietnam study guide worksheet, students investigate what led the United States into involvement in the Vietnam War. Students respond to 7 short answer questions based on the worksheet as well as textbook reading.
Students examine the impact of the Vietnam War. In this Vietnam War lesson, students discuss the music, the video images, and the culture of the war. Students create a classroom timeline that features major events in the war and write about how the war impacted the United States.
Students examine the role of the United States in the Vietnam War. In this Vietnam War lesson plan, students research primary and secondary sources to find out why the United States was involved in the war and why it was unsuccessful in the war.
Eighth graders study the historical significance of the Korean and Vietnam Wars in this unit of study. They investigate the different ideologies that were involved and examine the effect of the wars on local veterans.
Learners investigate the reasons for American military involvement in Vietnam. Among topics covered are the Domino Theory and the Cold War with the USSR. In small groups, students critically examine photographs from the war and complete photo analysis worksheets.
Students explore the beginning of Communism.  In this World History instructional activity, students exhibit their knowledge of Communism and the Marshall Plan through completion of a map activity.
This video brings viewers up to modern history (1975) after taking them through WWII, the Korean War, the Cuban Missile Crisis, and the Vietnam War. Though the format of the timeline might appear straightforward, viewers will be engaged because of the bright text and the relevant pictures. This resource provides just enough information to develop a firm grasp on the most important events of the 20th century.
Students "discover" top secret documents that describe the "Patriot" program. They are assigned the task of educating the American people about the threat of Soviets taking over America, including the key points of the Truman Doctrine from 1945 to 1990.
"It was my view then, and still is, that you don't make war without knowing why." Remembering Vietnam is a powerful resource. The essential questions, the activities, the readings, the materials examined all seek to provide learners with the information Tim O'Brien refers to in The Things they Carried. The objective stance permits individuals to formulate their own opinions about the Vietnam War and the Vietnam Memorial. A must-have for an English Language Arts or Social Studies curriculum library.
The Vietnam War is a fascinating topic. After reading or lecturing on this infamous war, give your class a 10-question multiple choice quiz to check for understanding. Saigon, military tactics, and major events are a few of the items they'll need to know to get an A.
Exploring the patterns and themes between Korea, Cuba, and Vietnam, including pre and post-U.S. involvement, this lecture reinforces the concept of history repeating itself. Corrupt regimes, the emergence of Communism and redistribution of wealth, and various attempts by the U.S. to stabilize each government all tie these nations together through the second part of the 20th century. Here is an excellent auxiliary for the end of a Cold War unit.
Students examine the arguments for and against the United States involvement in the Vietnam War. In groups, they must assign the Vietnam War a just or unjust war using the techniques used to fight and the reasons used by the government to declare war. They present their ideas to the class making sure to support their arguments. To end the lesson, they develop viable alternates to war.
Eighth graders explore Cold War Era threats. In this world history lesson, 8th graders research the threat of Communism and nuclear war brought about by the Korean War and Vietnam. Students watch clips of speeches and build a mock fallout shelter in their classroom.
A highly engaging warm-up activity kicks off this plan for teaching class members about the Vietnam War. After the anticipatory activity, the teacher chooses the means by which to provide an overview of the war (PowerPoint, lecture, textbook, etc.). Next, 11th graders answer a series of questions to ensure a fundamental understanding. Lastly, individuals receive a timeline strip with a particular event that they research. On paper, they create a description/depiction of the event and place it in chronological order with the other posters. All of the necessary resources are included.
No need to look any further. This resource has everything for a solid exploration of the role of African Americans in the Vietnam War. Class members read primary sources, including a Martin Luther King speech, political cartoons of the era, as well as a comic book. All of the discussion questions are included as are the materials. In the end, 11th graders create an informational flyer for King's April 4th, 1967 speech. It includes a synthesis of information they learned throughout.
Students examine life in Cambodia and Vietnam from 1975-1979, Pol Pot and the Khmer Rouge. They discuss how an otherwise peaceful society could allow such events to take place and write a short paper and complete a culminating project.

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Vietnam Communism